Media & Entertainment

  • May 28, 2024

    Industry Lines Up Behind Net Neutrality Repeal Measure

    Broadband service providers lined up Tuesday to support a Republican-backed U.S. House bill to repeal the Federal Communications Commission's recently passed net neutrality rules, but the measure faces a chilly reception in the Democrat-controlled Senate.

  • May 28, 2024

    Chancery Speeds Microsoft Query Over $68.7B Activision Deal

    Microsoft Corp. is entitled to a quick court declaration on whether its $68.7 billion acquisition of Activision Blizzard Inc. in October was valid, and a pension fund shareholder that challenged the deal has a right to be involved in the process, Delaware's Court of Chancery said Tuesday.

  • May 24, 2024

    Live Nation Ticket Buyers Follow Feds With Antitrust Suit

    Live Nation and Ticketmaster were hit with a consumer antitrust proposed class action Thursday accusing them of monopolizing concert promotion and ticketing for major concert venues following their 2010 merger, which comes on the heels of the U.S. Department of Justice's own lawsuit.

  • May 24, 2024

    5 Themes That Could Determine Trump's NY Criminal Trial

    With closing arguments set for Tuesday morning in Donald Trump's New York hush money case and deliberations on the horizon, here's a look at the themes that have dominated the historic, monthlong trial so far.

  • May 24, 2024

    Sony Denied Early Bid To Block PlayStation Antitrust Class

    A California federal judge Friday denied Sony's preemptive bid to deny class certification in a suit accusing it of overcharging PlayStation Store users through a monopoly on downloadable game cards, saying Sony has yet to show that the plaintiffs are bound by class action waivers, or it can enforce arbitration.

  • May 24, 2024

    Senate Republican Eyes Tutor.com's China Ties, Data Use

    The top Republican on the U.S. Senate's health and education committee has launched an investigation into Tutor.com, a Chinese-controlled web service of The Princeton Review that offers students online tutoring, saying China's Communist Party may be exploiting users' sensitive data.

  • May 24, 2024

    Uvalde Families Say Call Of Duty, Meta Groomed Shooter

    Families of schoolchildren shot at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, in 2022 alleged in a pair of lawsuits Friday that Meta Platforms' Instagram, the maker of first-person shooter video game Call of Duty, and a manufacturer of assault rifles helped inspire, train and equip the teenage gunman.

  • May 24, 2024

    Ousted Publishing CEO Not Satisfied With Say In Potential Sale

    The ousted CEO of the publisher behind the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and the Toledo Blade isn't dropping his case against his family's newspaper empire just because he won his bid to weigh in on the company's potential sale, his attorney told an Ohio state court judge Friday, who compared the conflict to a messy divorce.

  • May 24, 2024

    Malware Backdoor Found In Software Used By Courtrooms

    Software created by a company that provides digital audiovisual technology to courtrooms, jails and other facilities contains a backdoor associated with malware that disguises itself as a normal update, analysts at a cybersecurity firm reported, warning that "users are at high risk and should take immediate action."

  • May 24, 2024

    Jazz Director Accuses Philly Pops, Execs Of RICO Conspiracy

    A former Philly Pops jazz director has sued the defunct orchestra group, its ex-CEO, a rival orchestra, the Kimmel Center and others in Pennsylvania federal court, claiming they conspired to monopolize the orchestral music market and lied about the organization's debt to force it to shut down while depriving him of pay.

  • May 24, 2024

    Logan Paul's Energy Drink Co. Sues Boxer For Defamation

    Prime Hydration, led by YouTube celebrity Logan Paul, has accused boxer Ryan Garcia of defamation in Texas federal court over his ongoing campaign to paint the drink in a negative light, including saying it contains harmful chemicals like cyanide that will "hurt you big time."

  • May 24, 2024

    FCC Republican Knocks Plan To Require AI Ad Disclosures

    A Federal Communications Commission Republican is slamming a commission proposal aimed at limiting the use of artificial intelligence in political advertisements, saying the push is a politically motivated effort to stop Republicans from using AI.

  • May 24, 2024

    Bungie Cheat Code Sellers Hit With $63K Copyright Verdict

    A federal jury said Friday that people behind a video game cheat code owe Bungie about $63,000 for replicating a sci-fi shooter's code to make the cheat software and peddle it on the internet, capping off a nearly weeklong copyright trial in Seattle.

  • May 24, 2024

    'Vanderpump Rules' Star Can't Cancel 'Scandoval' Claims

    A California judge ruled Friday that "Vanderpump Rules" star Tom Sandoval cannot escape all claims in a suit by former co-star Rachel Leviss alleging he secretly recorded sexually explicit videos she sent him, leading to the show's "Scandoval" cheating scandal, dismissing one claim but allowing Leviss to amend the complaint.

  • May 24, 2024

    Alec Baldwin Must Face 'Rust' Shooting Charges

    A New Mexico state judge on Friday denied Alec Baldwin's motion to dismiss his indictment on involuntary manslaughter charges in the fatal on-set shooting of a cinematographer during the filming of "Rust" in Santa Fe, rejecting the actor's claims of prosecutorial misconduct before the grand jury.

  • May 24, 2024

    E-Rate Growth Needed As Other Funds Wane, FCC Chief Says

    Calling the E-Rate program for subsidizing broadband in schools and libraries a "quiet powerhouse," the head of the Federal Communications Commission is looking to build support in Congress to expand it to cover off-campus learning after pandemic rescue funds dissipated.

  • May 24, 2024

    Biden's Judicial Impact And What's Left On The Wish List

    President Joe Biden secured confirmation of his 200th federal judge Wednesday and has transformed the judiciary by picking more women and people of color than any other president. But the upcoming election season could derail his hopes of confirming many more judges.

  • May 24, 2024

    Off The Bench: NCAA Settles House NIL Class Action

    In this week’s Off the Bench, the NCAA settles its court dispute with hundreds of thousands of athletes over name, image and likeness compensation, NFL rookie Marvin Harrison Jr. is taken to court over an endorsement contract, and former Super Bowl champion Antonio Brown’s post-career life is burdened further by bankruptcy. If you were sidelined this week, Law360 is here to catch you up on the sports and betting stories that had our readers talking.

  • May 24, 2024

    New Minnesota Law Removes Barriers To Public Broadband

    Public broadband advocates on Friday lauded Minnesota's enactment of a state law making it easier to deploy community broadband networks.

  • May 24, 2024

    Exiled Chinese Businessman Is No $1B Fraudster, Jury Told

    Exiled Chinese businessman and purported billionaire Guo Wengui ran legitimate companies in support of a broad movement that opposed the Chinese Communist Party, his attorney told a Manhattan federal jury Friday, rather than what prosecutors say was a multifaceted $1 billion fraud.

  • May 24, 2024

    Weinstein Atty Trying To Chill Retrial Testimony, DA Says

    The Manhattan District Attorney's Office has argued that a lawyer for Harvey Weinstein violated ethics rules by publicly accusing one of the movie mogul's alleged rape victims of perjury in an "obvious" attempt to dissuade her from testifying again at an upcoming retrial.

  • May 24, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen an IT engineer seek permission to search a landfill hiding a hard drive supposedly storing millions of pounds in bitcoin, Glencore take on legal action by American Century Investments, gold payment app Glint bring a breach of duty claim against FRP Advisory, and an ongoing dispute between a solicitor and the Solicitors Regulation Authority. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • May 24, 2024

    CBS Says 1st Amendment Dooms White Writer's Bias Suit

    CBS said a California federal judge should toss a straight white male worker's bias suit claiming he was passed over for writer roles in favor of more diverse candidates, arguing that the First Amendment allows it to tap writers based on their identity as a storytelling operation.

  • May 24, 2024

    DOJ's Live Nation-Ticketmaster Suit: What You Should Know

    The U.S. Department of Justice and a slew of state attorneys general filed a suit challenging the 2010 merger of Ticketmaster and Live Nation. Here, catch up on Law360's coverage of the deal and those who have challenged it along the way – Taylor Swift fans, investors and regulators.

  • May 23, 2024

    FTC Blasts Amazon's 'Unbelievable' Claims About Signal Use

    The Federal Trade Commission on Thursday again pressed a Washington federal court to force Amazon to hand over documents regarding the company's communication preservation practices, calling Amazon's claims that executives never used the encrypted app Signal to discuss business practices relevant to the antitrust fight "unbelievable."

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Teaching Yoga Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Being a yoga instructor has helped me develop my confidence and authenticity, as well as stress management and people skills — all of which have crossed over into my career as an attorney, says Laura Gongaware at Clyde & Co.

  • A Vision For Economic Clerkships In The Legal System

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    As courts handle increasingly complex damages analyses involving vast amounts of data, an economic clerkship program — integrating early-career economists into the judicial system — could improve legal outcomes and provide essential training to clerks, say Mona Birjandi at Data for Decisions and Matt Farber at Secretariat.

  • When The Platform Is A Product, Strict Liability Can Attach

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    A New York state court's recent ruling in Patterson v. Meta, holding that social media platforms can be considered products, appears to be the first of its kind — but if it is upheld and adopted by other courts, the liability implications for internet companies could be incredibly far-reaching, say attorneys at Patterson Belknap.

  • 4 Sectors Will Likely Bear Initial Brunt Of FTC 'Junk Fees' Rule

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    If the Federal Trade Commission adopts its comprehensive proposed rule to ban unfair or deceptive fees across the U.S. economy, many businesses — including those in the lodging, event ticketing, dining and transportation sectors — will need to reexamine the way they market and price their products and services, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • 8 Legal Issues Influencing Investors In The Creator Economy

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    The rapidly expanding digital creator economy — funding for which more than doubled in the U.S. in the first quarter — comes with its own set of unique legal issues investors must carefully consider before diving in, say Louis Lehot and Alan Pate at Foley & Lardner.

  • Action Steps To Address New Restrictions On Outbound Data

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    Companies should immediately assess all their data-based operations so they can consider strategies to effectively mitigate new compliance risks brought on by recently implemented transaction restrictions, including a Justice Department proposal and landmark data legislation, say attorneys at Wiley.

  • E-Discovery Quarterly: Recent Rulings On Text Message Data

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    Electronically stored information on cellphones, and in particular text messages, can present unique litigation challenges, and recent court decisions demonstrate that counsel must carefully balance what data should be preserved, collected, reviewed and produced, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • CFPB Reality Check: Video Game Cash Is Still Money

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    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's recent report examining payments within online video games indicates that financial services offered within the game marketplace are quickly evolving to the point where they are indistinguishable from traditional financial services subject to regulation, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • How Copyright Office AI Standards Depart From Precedent

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    The U.S. Copyright Office's recent departure from decades of precedent for technology-assisted works, and express refusal to grant protection to artificial intelligence-assisted works, may change as the dust settles around ancillary copyright issues for AI currently pending in litigation, says Kristine Craig at Hanson Bridgett.

  • Keeping Up With Class Actions: A New Era Of Higher Stakes

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    Corporate defendants saw unprecedented settlement numbers across all areas of class action litigation in 2022 and 2023, and this year has kept pace so far, with three settlements that stand out for the nature of the claims and for their high dollar amounts, says Gerald Maatman at Duane Morris.

  • 8 Questions To Ask Before Final CISA Breach Reporting Rule

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    The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency’s recently proposed cyber incident reporting requirements for critical infrastructure entities represent the overall approach CISA will take in its final rule, so companies should be asking key compliance questions now and preparing for a more complicated reporting regime, say Arianna Evers and Shannon Mercer at WilmerHale.

  • Is The Digital Accessibility Storm Almost Over?

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    Though private businesses have faced a decadelong deluge of digital accessibility complaints in the absence of clear regulations or uniformity among the courts, attorneys at Epstein Becker address how recent federal courts’ pushback against serial Americans with Disabilities Act plaintiffs and the U.S. Department of Justice’s proposed government accessibility standards may presage a break in the downpour.

  • Series

    Swimming Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Years of participation in swimming events, especially in the open water, have proven to be ideal preparation for appellate arguments in court — just as you must put your trust in the ocean when competing in a swim event, you must do the same with the judicial process, says John Kulewicz at Vorys.

  • How Courts Are Interpreting Fed. Circ. IPR Estoppel Ruling

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    In the year since the Federal Circuit’s Ironburg ruling, which clarified the scope of inter partes and post-grant review estoppel, district court decisions show that application of IPR or PGR estoppel may become a resource-intensive inquiry, say Whitney Meier Howard and Michelle Lavrichenko at Venable.

  • What 100 Federal Cases Suggest About Changes To Chevron

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    With the U.S. Supreme Court poised to overturn or narrow its 40-year-old doctrine of Chevron deference, a review of 100 recent federal district court decisions confirm that changes to the Chevron framework will have broad ramifications — but the magnitude of the impact will depend on the details of the high court's ruling, say Kali Schellenberg and Jon Cochran at LeVan Stapleton.

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