Life Sciences

  • April 30, 2024

    BCBS Says Federal Drug Law Preempts NM Medical Weed Row

    A group of insurers, including Blue Cross and Blue Shield of New Mexico, urged a New Mexico federal judge to reject a proposed class action seeking to compel them to cover their policyholders' medical marijuana costs, arguing that state law doesn't require it and federal law forbids it.

  • April 30, 2024

    Pfizer Can't Slip COVID-19 Vax Suit, Texas Tells Court

    The Texas attorney general told a federal judge not to let Pfizer Inc. out of its suit accusing the pharmaceutical company of misleading the public about its COVID-19 vaccine, arguing the suit was properly pled under state law in a brief filed Monday.

  • April 30, 2024

    Drug Company Can't Escape Texas Counties' Opioid MDL

     A Texas appeals court on Tuesday declined to cut loose a New Jersey-based pharmaceutical manufacturer from Texas multidistrict litigation over opioid addiction in the state, finding that the counties of Dallas and Bexar have demonstrated that it's made deliberate moves toward the Texas market.

  • April 30, 2024

    3rd Circ. Preview: Kavanaugh Classmate Takes On HuffPost

    The Third Circuit's May lineup will find the court weighing HuffPost's battle with an allegedly libeled former classmate of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh and claims by consumers alleging they bought defective Bayer antifungal medicine.

  • April 30, 2024

    Judge Tosses LTL's Suit Over Article Linking Talc To Cancer

    A New Jersey federal judge on Tuesday tossed a suit from the bankrupt talc unit of Johnson & Johnson accusing three doctors of damaging its business through a medical journal article it claimed was backed by "junk science," ruling that the doctors having served as expert witnesses in the Garden State is not enough to show that the court has jurisdiction over its claims.

  • April 30, 2024

    FTC Continues To Target 'Junk' Drug Patents

    Federal trade officials told a series of pharmaceutical companies — including the makers of the controversial diabetes and weight loss drug Ozempic — that they may have listed faulty patents in a key register of a federal drug database.

  • April 30, 2024

    Vaxart Investors Want Sanctions Over Deleted Texts

    A group of Vaxart investors asked a California federal judge to issue sanctions against Armistice Capital LLC, which previously controlled Vaxart and allegedly sold $267 million worth of its Vaxart shares at inflated prices, saying the hedge fund and its executives purposely deleted text messages integral to the investors' claims.

  • April 30, 2024

    Feds Endorse Easing Marijuana Status In Big Policy Shift

    Federal drug enforcers will recommend loosening restrictions on cannabis for the first time since the drug was made federally illegal decades ago, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday.

  • April 30, 2024

    Don't Miss It: McDermott, Paul Weiss Lead Month's Hot Deals

    A lot can happen in the world of mergers and acquisitions over the course of a month. Here, Law360 recaps the deals you may have missed, including transactions helmed by McDermott and Paul Weiss.

  • April 30, 2024

    Medical Device Biz Hologic To Buy UK Rival For $310M

    Hologic Inc. has agreed to buy Endomagnetics Ltd., a developer of breast cancer surgery technology, for approximately $310 million, as the U.S. medical company moves to expand its presence in the women's health sector.

  • April 29, 2024

    Pfizer Inks $25M Deal Ending Leftover Effexor Antitrust Claims

    A proposed class of indirect buyers have asked a New Jersey federal judge to greenlight a $25.5 million settlement to end allegations that Pfizer unit Wyeth engaged in a scheme with Teva Pharmaceuticals to delay generic competition for the antidepressant Effexor XR.

  • April 29, 2024

    Judge Rejects 2 Challenges To Medicare Drug Price Talks

    A New Jersey federal judge on Monday shot down a pair of challenges to the Medicare drug price negotiations, extending a string of court victories for the Biden administration as it defends the talks as entirely voluntary.

  • April 29, 2024

    Sandoz Says Biopharma Biz Added 'Poison' To Market

    More than $160 million separate generic-drug maker Sandoz Inc. and biopharmaceutical firm United Therapeutics Corp. in their estimates of damages suffered by Sandoz when the other company effectively blocked the sale of Sandoz's generic version of a hypertension medication, according to opening statements Monday during a bench trial in New Jersey federal court.

  • April 29, 2024

    Mistrial Called In $86M Stent Patent Case Against Medtronic

    An $86 million case in Texas over stents sold by medical device giant Medtronic has ended in a mistrial after U.S. District Judge Alan Albright was notified that a juror didn't want to budge on a position that was at odds with the rest of the jurors.

  • April 29, 2024

    Boehringer Accused Of Monopolizing Inhaler Product Market

    Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals has manipulated the U.S. patent and drug approval system to unlawfully block makers of generic inhaler medications, health and welfare funds claimed in a lawsuit filed Monday in Connecticut federal court, arguing that the "availability of generics has tangible cost and life-saving effects."

  • April 29, 2024

    Pharma Co. Hit With Investor Suit Over Liver Drug Trials

    Biopharmaceutical company Akero Therapeutics and three of its executives were hit with a proposed class action in California federal court alleging they made misleading statements about the patient population in a clinical trial for its liver disease treatment.

  • April 29, 2024

    HHS Delays Menthol Cigarette Ban Indefinitely

    U.S. Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services Xavier Becerra said Friday that a proposed ban on menthol cigarettes has been put on hold for now, citing the need to process considerable feedback from civil rights groups and the criminal justice movement.

  • April 29, 2024

    Amid Backlash, FDA Extends Control For Lab-Developed Tests

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration inked a final rule Monday that gives the agency broad authority over lab-developed tests by classifying them as medical devices, a move that has drawn ire from congressional leadership and those in the healthcare and life sciences industries.

  • April 29, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A multibillion-dollar Tesla trust proposal, a Truth Social bond, power plays over Prince's estate, and three in the ring for World Wrestling Entertainment. All of this and much more came up in Delaware Chancery Court dockets last week.

  • April 29, 2024

    AI Pharma Co. Sued By Investor Over Handling Of Fired CEO

    Artificial intelligence-driven pharmaceutical company Exscientia PLC has been hit with a proposed class action alleging its former CEO engaged in inappropriate personal relationships with employees, and that the company's chairman knew but concealed it.

  • April 29, 2024

    Alcon Owes $34M In Glaucoma Patent Row, Jury Finds

    A Delaware federal jury has found that Alcon and various related entities are on the hook for a $34 million judgment in a patent suit about medical devices to treat glaucoma launched by Sight Sciences.

  • April 29, 2024

    4th Circ. OKs Sanctions Against Law Firm In Bestwall Ch. 11

    A split Fourth Circuit panel on Monday refused to overturn more than $402,000 in sanctions against a law firm and its clients as part of bankruptcy proceedings for a Georgia-Pacific unit, saying the contempt and sanctions orders can't be appealed because they aren't final judgments.

  • April 29, 2024

    PTAB Rejects Masimo's Concurrent Bid To Review Apple Patent

    A board of administrative patent judges has declined one of the petitions challenging claims in an Apple patent involved in some of its disputes with medical technology startups Masimo and AliveCor, citing the board's skeptical view of "multiple, staggered petitions."

  • April 29, 2024

    Judge Rejects Class Certification Of Seizure Drug Customers

    An Illinois federal judge has rejected a class certification bid in a suit against drugmaker Mallinckrodt and prescription delivery platform Express Scripts, ruling that the plaintiffs were unable to meet their predominance burden as a class.

  • April 29, 2024

    Connecticut Firm Seeks $500K Fee In Magnesium Class Action

    A Connecticut law firm has asked a New Jersey federal judge to approve its request for $500,000 in attorney fees and expenses for its representation in a class action over a company's allegedly deceptive advertising of a magnesium supplement.

Expert Analysis

  • The Road Ahead For Florida's Drug Importation Program

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    Though the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Florida's drug importation program in January, a series of hurdles — including requisite buy-in from Canada — and potential legal challenges must be addressed before importation can begin, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Assessing CDC's Revised Guideline On Opioid Prescriptions

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    Kenneth Weinstein, Nicholas Van Niel and Kate Uthe at Analysis Group look at newly available data to evaluate the impact that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's revised opioid monitoring guideline have had on prescription trends in recent years, highlighting both specific and overall decreases.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Forget Everything You Know About IRAC

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    The mode of legal reasoning most students learn in law school, often called “Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion,” or IRAC, erroneously frames analysis as a separate, discrete step, resulting in disorganized briefs and untold obfuscation — but the fix is pretty simple, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Valeant Ruling May Pave Way For Patent-Based FCA Suits

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent ruling in Silbersher v. Valeant marks a significant development in False Claims Act jurisprudence, opens new avenues for litigation and potentially raises the stakes for patent applicants who intend to do business with the government, say Joshua Robbins and Rick Taché at Buchalter.

  • Opinion

    Suits Against Insulin Pricing Are Driven By Rebate Addiction

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    A growing wave of lawsuits filed by states, cities and counties against insulin manufacturers and pharmacy benefit managers improperly allocate the blame for rising insulin costs, when in actuality the plaintiffs are partially responsible, says Dan Leonard at Granite Capitol Consulting.

  • Lessons For D&O Policyholders From Pharma Co. Ruling

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    A California federal court's recent decision in AmTrust v. 180 Life Sciences, requiring insurers to advance defense costs for a potentially covered claim, provides a valuable road map for directors and officers insurance policyholders, rebutting the common presumption that a D&O insurer's duty to advance costs is more limited than under other policies, say attorneys at Pasich.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Args In APA Case Amplify Justices' Focus On Agency Power

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    In arguments last week in Corner Post v. Federal Reserve, the U.S. Supreme Court justices paid particular importance to the possible ripple effects of their decision, which will address when a facial challenge to long-standing federal rules under the Administrative Procedure Act first accrues and could thus unleash a flood of new lawsuits, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Gulf Cooperation Council

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    The Gulf Cooperation Council is in the early stages of ESG policy implementation, but recent commitments by both states and corporations — including increases in sustainable finance transactions, environmental commitments, female representation on boards and human rights enforcement — show continuing progress toward broader ESG goals, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Opinion

    J&J Bankruptcy Could Thwart Accountability For Victims

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    Johnson & Johnson's latest attempt at a "Texas Two-Step" bankruptcy proceeding exemplifies the way in which corporate defendants can use bankruptcy to evade accountability, limit resources available to victims, and impose flawed, one-size-fits-all resolutions on diverse groups of plaintiffs, says Michelle Simpson Tuegel at Simpson Tuegel Law.

  • Inside The PTAB's Seagen Cancer Drug Patent Decision

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    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board's recent finding that Seagen's claims for antibody-drug conjugate technology were unpatentable — for lack of enablement, lack of written description and anticipation — mark the latest chapter in the complex patent dispute as the case heads for director review, says Ryan Hagglund at Loeb & Loeb.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Opinion

    Biden Admin's March-In Plan Would Hurt Medical Innovation

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    The Biden administration's proposal to reinterpret the Bayh-Dole Act and allow the government to claw back patents when it determines that a commercialized product's price is too high would discourage private investment in important research and development, says Ken Thorpe at the Rollins School of Public Health.

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