Wage & Hour

  • June 03, 2024

    Kroger, Albertsons Can't Get More Info On FTC Markets

    An Oregon federal judge denied Kroger and Albertsons' requests for more information on the markets at issue in the Federal Trade Commission's ongoing attempt to block their merger, saying the companies' request is premature and excessively broad.

  • June 03, 2024

    El Pollo Loco Hit With Wage, Hostile Work Environment Claims

    El Pollo Loco did not provide a former assistant manager with meal breaks or overtime or pay him the full wages he was promised, and store managers mocked him for requesting leave to tend to his ailing mother, the ex-worker alleged in a complaint filed in state court.

  • June 03, 2024

    DHL, Courier Service Agree To Shell Out $1M In OT Suit

    DHL and its direct courier services told a Washington federal court they have agreed to shell out $1 million to a group of drivers who claimed they were paid a flat daily rate that did not include overtime.

  • June 03, 2024

    As State Minimum Wages Rise, Fewer Workers At Fed. Floor

    The relevance of the federal minimum wage, which trails the floor in more than half of U.S. states, remains up for debate, as a recent government report says the share of hourly workers making that national amount continues to decline.

  • June 03, 2024

    Fisher Phillips Grows In Tampa With Cantrell Astbury Founder

    Employer-side law firm Fisher Phillips announced Monday that it added a new of counsel to its Tampa, Florida, office who was previously a shareholder and founder of a boutique employment law firm.

  • June 03, 2024

    Vanderbilt Health, Nurse's Pay System Suit Deal OK'd

    A Tennessee federal judge approved a confidential deal ending a retired nurse's claims that Vanderbilt University Medical Center failed to pay patient-facing employees for meal breaks they had to work through nor properly track their hours after the timekeeping system went offline.

  • June 03, 2024

    Mich. High Court Keeps $15 Min. Wage Proposal Off Ballot

    An initiative to raise the hourly minimum wage in Michigan to $15 by 2027 will stay off the 2024 ballot, the state Supreme Court ruled, turning down a group's bid to force the state canvassers board to certify the proposal.

  • June 03, 2024

    Ex-Servers Win Class Cert. In Tip Suit Against NY Restaurants

    A New York federal judge granted class certification to a group of workers for two Manhattan Chinese restaurants who claim they were forced to share tips with nontipped co-workers and underpaid, finding the restaurants' policies similarly affected all tipped workers.

  • June 03, 2024

    Justices Won't Mull Worker-Friendly Ruling On Preshift Pay

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined on Monday to hear a case asking how to decide when an employer must pay employees for time they spend on preshift tasks that are necessary for them to do their jobs.

  • June 01, 2024

    Blockbuster Summer: 10 Big Issues Justices Still Must Decide

    As the calendar flips over to June, the U.S. Supreme Court still has heaps of cases to decide on issues ranging from trademark registration rules to judicial deference and presidential immunity. Here, Law360 looks at 10 of the most important topics the court has yet to decide.

  • May 31, 2024

    5th Circuit Decision Hints At Salary Debates To Come

    What constitutes a bona fide salary for overtime-exempt professionals continues to be a source for debate, and a recent Fifth Circuit decision affirms long-standing principles behind federal salary regulations while presaging future battles around whether those regulations are valid, attorneys say. 

  • May 31, 2024

    3rd Circ. Preview: Labor Battles Heat Up In June

    Several cases are heating up the Third Circuit argument calendar in June, including a home care company's attempt to duck a $7 million payout to thousands of workers who claimed the company violated the Fair Labor Standards Act by not compensating them for travel time.

  • May 31, 2024

    Maritime Employees Stiffed On Sick Leave, Wash. Court Told

    A nonprofit representing shipping industry employers and a Washington state marine terminal operator have not been providing longshoremen with paid sick leave in violation of state wage law and a Seattle city ordinance, a longshoreman told a state court.

  • May 31, 2024

    NYC Landlord Inks Deal To End Wage Theft Suit

    A former maintenance worker has agreed in principle to settle his proposed wage theft collective action against a New York City landlord and its property manager, according to a letter filed Friday in New York federal court.

  • May 31, 2024

    NY Forecast: Judge Considers IATSE Movie Pay Dispute

    This week, a New York federal judge will hear arguments over the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees' attempt to force a film production company to make wage and benefits payments the union claims it has not made as required under an arbitration award.

  • May 31, 2024

    Complaints About BC Tennis Coach Led To Firing, Suit Says

    A former assistant women's tennis coach at Boston College says the head coach of the program "set out on a campaign to undermine and alienate" her out of professional jealousy and gender bias, alleging she was fired in retaliation after complaining to administrators.

  • May 31, 2024

    Split NH High Court Says Cops Must Pay Back Sick Leave

    An updated version of a City of Manchester ordinance requires four police officers to pay the city back for the sick leave benefits they received while their compensation claims for on-the-job injuries were pending, a split New Hampshire Supreme Court ruled.

  • May 31, 2024

    Steptoe Adds To Employment Department In Pittsburgh Office

    A commercial litigator's plan to refocus her practice on employment law prompted a recent move to Steptoe & Johnson PLLC's Pittsburgh office after more than eight years with Sherrard German & Kelly P.C.

  • May 31, 2024

    Store Applicant Wants Pay Range Case In State Court ASAP

    A job applicant told a Washington federal judge not to grant retailer Aaron's bid to appeal to the Ninth Circuit his case accusing it of violating a state requirement to include pay ranges in job advertisements, saying it contradicts the company's claim the suit shouldn't be in federal court.

  • May 31, 2024

    Ex-OneMain Atty Joins Semmes' Baltimore Employment Team

    LaTonya D. Reynolds had early dreams of being an international corporate attorney, but a passion for finance and taxation, and later, employment law, ultimately led her to her new role as counsel in the labor and employment practice group of Semmes Bowen & Semmes in Baltimore.

  • May 31, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: State Justices To Hear 'Sovereignty' Args

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for oral arguments at the California Supreme Court regarding whether all public entities are exempt from certain state labor law wage requirements. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • May 31, 2024

    Customer Support Co. Assails DOL Early Win Bid In Wage Suit

    Employees for a customer support services company have control over their work and manage their own business, the company told a Florida federal court in its request to stop the U.S. Department of Labor from securing an early win in an independent contractor classification case.

  • May 31, 2024

    DOL Asks To Wait To Disclose Workers In Fishery Wage Case

    The U.S. Department of Labor urged a Mississippi federal court to halt the disclosure of the identities of some migrant workers who helped in the department's investigation of a fish farm, saying that it plans to ask the court to reconsider ordering the disclosure.

  • May 30, 2024

    9th Circ. Reopens Mandatory Security Check Wage Fight

    The Ninth Circuit on Thursday largely revived a proposed wage class action by a subcontractor who sought to be paid for undergoing mandatory security checks and vehicle inspections at a solar project site, following the California Supreme Court's ruling that found the time to be compensable as "hours worked."

  • May 30, 2024

    Divided FTC Won't Delay Kroger-Albertsons In-House Case

    The Federal Trade Commission's three Democrats refused Wednesday to delay the agency in-house challenge to Kroger's $24.6 billion purchase of Albertsons, blaming the grocery giants for their scheduling challenges and drawing a sharp dissent from the FTC's two Republicans.

Expert Analysis

  • Calif., Wash. Rest Break Waivers: What Carriers Must Know

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    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's recent invitation for petitions to waive its rules on meal and rest breaks for commercial drivers in California and Washington is an unusual move, and the agency's own guidance seems to acknowledge that its plan may face legal challenges, says Jessica Scott at Wheeler Trigg.

  • Eye On Compliance: Women's Soccer Puts Equal Pay In Focus

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    As the U.S. Women's National Team returns from World Cup, employers can honor the fighting spirit of the athletes — which won them a historic gender pay equality settlement in 2022 — by reviewing federal equal pay compliance requirements and committing to a level playing field for all genders, says Christina Heischmidt at Wilson Elser.

  • How New Illinois Child Influencer Law Affects Advertisers

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    Although Illinois' recently amended child labor law puts the burden on vloggers to ensure minors under the age of 16 featured in online videos are properly compensated, lack of compliance could reflect negatively on advertisers by association, say Monique Bhargava and Edward Fultz at Reed Smith.

  • Lessons On Using 'Advice Of Counsel' Defense In FLSA Suits

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    Several Fair Labor Standards Act cases illustrate the dangers inherent in employers trying to use the advice-of-counsel defense as a shield against liability while attempting to guard attorney-client privilege over relevant communications, says Mark Tabakman at Fox Rothschild.

  • DC Circ. Ruling Puts Issue Class Cert. Under Microscope

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    The D.C. Circuit's recent Harris v. Medical Transportation Management decision, which pushed back against lax application of Rule 23(c)(4) to certify issue classes as an end-run around the predominance requirement, provides potentially persuasive fodder for seeking to limit the scope of issue classes in other circuits, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Ensuring Child Labor Law Compliance Amid Growing Scrutiny

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    Amid increased attention on child labor law violations, employers should review their policies and practices with respect to the employment of minors, particularly underage migrants who do not have any parents in the U.S., say Felicia O'Connor and Morgan McDonald at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employer Best Practices For Pay Transparency Compliance

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    With conflicting pay transparency and disclosure laws appearing across the country, employers must carefully develop different strategies for discussing compensation with employees, applicants, and off-site workers, disclosing salaries in job ads, and staying abreast of new state and local compliance requirements, says Joy Rosenquist at Littler Mendelson.

  • Calif. Cos. May Have To Reimburse More Remote Work Costs

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    After a California appeals court's recent decision in Thai v. IBM, countless California employers will be required to pay work-related costs incurred by their employees who were sent home during the pandemic, and this could be just the beginning of a reckoning, say Sonya Goodwin at Sauer & Wagner.

  • Water Cooler Talk: 'The Bear' Serves Up Advice For Managers

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with Ernst & Young’s Laura Yehuda about Hulu's "The Bear" and the best practices managers can glean from the show's portrayal of workplace challenges, including those faced by young, female managers.

  • Calif. Employers Note: Industrial Welfare Commission Is Back

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    An appropriations bill recently passed in California instructs the Industrial Welfare Commission to reconvene for the first time in 19 years, opening a door for the regulatory body to significantly affect employer operations by strengthening standards for meal and rest breaks, scheduling, record-keeping, and more, say Denisha McKenzie and John Keeney at CDF Labor Law.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Colorado Antitrust Reform Carries Broad State Impact

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    Colorado recently became the latest state to update and expand its antitrust laws, and the new act may significantly affect enforcement and private litigation, particularly when it comes to workers and consumers, says Diane Hazel at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employer Tips For Fighting Back Against Explosive Verdicts

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    Massive jury verdicts are a product of our time, driven in part by reptile tactics, but employers can build a strategic defense to mitigate the risk of a runaway jury, and develop tools to seek judicial relief in the event of an adverse outcome, say Dawn Solowey and Lynn Kappelman at Seyfarth.