Wage & Hour

  • May 16, 2024

    High Court Decision Requiring A Stay Raises More Questions

    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous decision Thursday finding that federal courts must honor a request to stay a case after ordering the dispute into arbitration leaves an important subsequent question unresolved: What happens if neither party requests a stay?

  • May 16, 2024

    Calif. Panel Says Signature Wasn't Rebutted On Arbitral Pact

    A worker failed to show that a signature in an employee handbook containing an arbitration clause wasn't his, a California state appeals court ruled, flipping a trial court's decision that denied a mining company's bid to arbitrate his wage and hour suit.

  • May 16, 2024

    Wis. Appeals Court Undoes Corrections Workers' Wage Class

    A Wisconsin appeals court dissolved a class of state Department of Corrections employees who argued they are owed pay for the time they spent undergoing security checks and walking to and from their assigned work posts, ruling a lower court used an invalid legal theory in certifying the group.

  • May 16, 2024

    Ex-Bronx DA Worker Says Discrimination Suit Should Stand

    A former employee at the Bronx District Attorney's Office said Thursday she supported her claims that the office discriminated against her for seeking medical leave and denied her a promotion because she's Black, urging a New York federal court to keep alive her suit alive.

  • May 16, 2024

    Pressure Mounts On Biden Admin To Finalize Regulations

    The U.S. Department of Labor and other federal agencies face pressure to complete rulemaking this month because a window opens soon that will make it easier for Republicans in Congress to wipe away regulations if they and former President Donald Trump sweep the November elections, experts told Law360.

  • May 16, 2024

    Delta, Flight Attendants Ink $16M Deal To End Wage Suit

    Delta Air Lines flight attendants reached a nearly $16 million settlement with the company in an almost decadelong suit accusing the airline of wage statement violations, they told a California federal judge, saying the "extremely favorable" deal should be approved because it would give class members close to full reimbursement.

  • May 16, 2024

    SC Convenience Store Pays $154K For OT Violations

    A gas station and convenience store in South Carolina paid nearly $154,000 for denying workers overtime rates, the U.S. Department of Labor said.

  • May 16, 2024

    Justices Say Courts Must Stay Suits Sent To Arbitration

    The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously concluded Thursday that federal courts do not have discretion to toss a case once it's decided that the claims belong in arbitration, ruling in a wage and overtime suit brought by delivery drivers against their employer.

  • May 16, 2024

    Justices Say Deadline To Appeal Furlough Denial Is Flexible

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday revived a Pentagon employee's dispute seeking an exemption from a furlough, saying that a missed 60-day deadline to appeal the denied exemption does not put the matter out of federal courts' jurisdiction.

  • May 15, 2024

    Georgia Justices Weigh State Immunity In Trooper's Wage Suit

    Georgia's Department of Public Safety urged the state's highest court on Wednesday to undo a Georgia Court of Appeals decision that revived a state trooper's suit alleging that the department failed to pay him owed overtime for time spent in training, arguing that the state never waived its sovereign immunity privilege.

  • May 15, 2024

    Worker Updates Boot-Up Suit After Judge Axes State Claims

    A former call center worker on Tuesday lodged an amended class action complaint seeking boot-up time wages from a home healthcare company, raising only federal claims after a Michigan federal judge earlier this year stripped state law allegations from the suit.

  • May 15, 2024

    Wage Damages Update Isn't Retroactive, NJ Justices Say

    The New Jersey Supreme Court on Wednesday held an amendment to the state's wage laws adding liquidated damages and extending the statute of limitations should only be applied to conduct that occurred after its effective date, backing the dismissal of some claims brought by laborers alleging unpaid pre- and post-shift work.

  • May 15, 2024

    Staffing Co.'s Wage Settlement Gets Approval On 4th Attempt

    After three tries, a Georgia federal judge approved a settlement Wednesday between a staffing firm and two workers who alleged that the firm shorted them on wages by making them work through unpaid meal breaks, finding the latest amendment fixed previous inconsistencies.

  • May 15, 2024

    School District, Teachers Can't Snag Win In Equal Pay Fight

    Neither a Pennsylvania school district nor the female teachers accusing it of paying them less than their male colleagues can snag a win in two consolidated Equal Pay Act suits, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, saying there are still open questions in the cases.

  • May 15, 2024

    Tenn. Restaurant Workers Get Approval Of Tip Violation Deal

    A Nashville, Tennessee, restaurant will pay $375,000 to end a collective action claiming it stiffed tipped employees on their full wages, after a Tennessee federal judge signed off on a settlement. 

  • May 15, 2024

    AstraZeneca Sales Reps Win Early Cert. In Gender Bias Suit

    An Illinois federal judge on Tuesday granted a bid by workers to conditionally certify a collective in a lawsuit alleging AstraZeneca paid women less than men, giving the green light for notices to be sent out to female sales representatives who have worked at the pharmaceutical giant since late 2018.

  • May 15, 2024

    Untranslated Arbitral Pact Can Stand In Wage Row, Panel Says

    A California winery's failure to translate an arbitration agreement from English to Spanish doesn't make the pact fraudulent, a state appellate panel ruled, flipping a trial court's decision finding that a group of former cellar workers could keep their wage suit in court.

  • May 15, 2024

    Last-Mile Amazon Driver Does Interstate Work, Panel Says

    A driver for a logistics company who primarily made local deliveries for Amazon was engaged in interstate commerce and thus exempt from mandatory arbitration, a California appeals court has held, saying the worker's wage and hour claims can remain in state court.

  • May 15, 2024

    IT Recruiters Pursue Win Against Staffing Co. In OT Class Suit

    Recruiters for tech staffing company TEKsystems have asked a California federal judge to award them a pretrial win on their claim that the company misclassified them, saying recruiters are entry-level employees, not managers, so they don't qualify for the narrow exemption to California's overtime statute.

  • May 15, 2024

    Chemical Biz's Worker Numbers Can't Keep Wage Suit Federal

    A chemical company failed to show that more than 100 workers would be part of a proposed class in a suit claiming unpaid wages, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled, sending the suit back to state court.

  • May 15, 2024

    Toss Of Bonus Bias Claim Too Short On Details, 5th Circ. Says

    The Fifth Circuit has reinstated a Hispanic salesman's claim that he was denied $160,000 in bonuses by a construction contractor out of racial bias after he was fired, ruling the lower court didn't adequately explain why it nixed that allegation.

  • May 15, 2024

    FedEx Contractor Wage Deal Needs Work, Judge Rules

    A California federal judge wouldn't sign off on a settlement for more than $33,000 between a FedEx contractor and delivery drivers to partly end a wage suit that named both FedEx and the contractor, telling the parties the terms lacked necessary information.

  • May 14, 2024

    Venable Opens Colo. Office With 8 Sherman & Howard Attys

    Venable LLP is growing its presence by opening its first office in Colorado, with eight commercial and employment attorneys from Sherman & Howard LLP opening its Denver location, which will be headed by partner-in-charge James "Jim" Sawtelle, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • May 14, 2024

    Conn. Retaliation Suit Advances After Justices' Title VII Ruling

    With a recent U.S. Supreme Court opinion said to be illuminating the path forward, a federal judge in Connecticut has declined to dismiss a case by a self-described former "high-level" employee of a private equity firm who alleges she was fired after raising concerns about her employer's treatment of women.

  • May 14, 2024

    Revised $2.25M Walmart OT Deal Fails For Lack Of Changes

    A California federal judge again refused to approve a $2.25 million deal between Walmart and 1,700 workers that would resolve an unpaid overtime lawsuit, finding that the modified agreement did not fix deficiencies the court had previously identified in the settlement's distribution method.

Expert Analysis

  • Eye On Compliance: Cross-State Noncompete Agreements

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    The Federal Trade Commission's recent proposal to limit the application of worker noncompete agreements is a timely reminder for prudent employers to reexamine their current policies and practices around such covenants — especially businesses with operational footprints spanning more than one state, says Jeremy Stephenson at Wilson Elser.

  • A DOL Reminder That ADA Doesn't Limit FMLA Protections

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    A recent U.S. Department of Labor opinion letter and some case law make clear that the Family and Medical Leave Act fills in gaps where the Americans with Disabilities Act may not neatly apply, however the agency ignored a number of courts that have supported termination when "no overtime" restrictions effectively reduce a position to part-time, says Jeff Nowak at Littler Mendelson.

  • Pending NCAA Ruling Could Spell Change For Unpaid Interns

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    The Third Circuit's upcoming Johnson v. NCAA decision, over whether student-athletes can be considered university employees, could reverberate beyond college sports and force employers with unpaid student interns to add these workers to their payrolls, say Babak Yousefzadeh and Skyler Hicks at Sheppard Mullin.

  • How Managers Can Curb Invisible Off-The-Clock Work Claims

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    There has been a rash of recent federal lawsuits in which nonexempt employees have alleged their employers failed to pay them for off-the-clock work done without their managers' knowledge, but employers taking proactive measures to limit such work may substantially lower litigation risks, says Robert Turk at Stearns Weaver.

  • 5 Potential Perils Of Implementing Employee Sabbaticals

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    As companies try to retain employees with sabbatical benefits amid record-low unemployment rates, employers should be aware of several potential legal risks when considering policies to allow these leave periods, say Jesse Dill and Corissa Pennow at Ogletree.

  • NY Hospitality Employers Face Lofty Compliance Burden

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    As New York hospitality businesses have reopened over the last year, there are more employment compliance considerations now than ever before, including regulations and laws related to wage rates, tip credits, just cause and uniform maintenance pay, say attorneys at Reed Smith.

  • COVID's Impact On Employment Law Is Still Felt 3 Years Later

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    Since COVID-19's onset in the U.S. three years ago, almost every existing aspect of employment law has been shaped by pandemic-induced changes, including accommodation requests under the Americans with Disabilities Act, remote work policies and employer vaccine mandates, say Scott Allen and M.C. Cravatta at Foley & Lardner.

  • Ecolab Ruling Opens Doors For Percentage Bonuses In Calif.

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    California's Second Appellate District recently became the first court in the state to clear the air on percentage bonuses, providing employers who have wanted to offer such bonuses with a new option to do so without having to recalculate the overtime regular rate, says Paul Lynd at ArentFox Schiff.

  • How Employers Can Defend Against Claims Made In Bad Faith

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    When an employer becomes aware of an employee complaint, it should carefully research whether the claim could be characterized as frivolous or in bad faith, and then consider various defense strategies, say Ellen Holloman and Jaclyn Hall at Cadwalader.

  • Encouraging Labor Abuse Reports Beyond The PAGA Model

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    The recent stalling of several state bills modeled after California's Private Attorneys General Act, which would allow workers to sue on behalf of the state over labor violations, suggests budget-constrained regulators should consider alternative tools for incentivizing employees to flag workplace abuses, says Joseph Jeziorkowski at Valiant Law.

  • Eye On Compliance: Service Animal Accommodations

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    A Michigan federal court's recent ruling in Bennett v. Hurley Medical Center provides guidance on when employee service animals must be permitted in the workplace — a question otherwise lacking clarity under the Americans with Disabilities Act that has emerged as people return to the office post-pandemic, says Lauren Stadler at Wilson Elser.

  • Joint Employment Mediation Sessions Are Worth The Work

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    Despite the recent trend away from joint mediation in employment disputes, and the prevailing belief that putting both parties in the same room is only a recipe for lost ground, face-to-face sessions can be valuable tools for moving toward win-win resolutions when planned with certain considerations in mind, says Jonathan Andrews at Signature Resolution.

  • Takeaways From Virgin's Wage And Hour Class Action Loss

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    A California district court recently issued a $31 million judgment against Virgin America in a wage and hour class action brought by flight attendants, a reminder that the state Labor Code's reach extends beyond the Golden State when the facts show a strong connection to work performed there, says Julie O’Dell at Armstrong Teasdale.