Discrimination

  • May 17, 2024

    Many Plans Already In Front Of 11th Circ. Trans Health Ruling

    The Eleventh Circuit's recent decision that a county health plan's coverage exclusion for gender transition surgery violated federal anti-discrimination law likely won't have a big impact on plans because they have already made adjustments for the U.S. Supreme Court ruling the appeals court applied, experts say.

  • May 16, 2024

    Disney Strikes Deal To Exit Hispanic Worker's Bias Suit

    A Disney subsidiary reached an agreement Thursday with a former Walt Disney World worker to end her lawsuit alleging the company unlawfully fired her after a co-worker overheard her tell a story about disciplining her son for using the N-word, a filing in Florida federal court said.

  • May 16, 2024

    Flight Attendant Fights United's Bid To Exit Disability Bias Suit

    A former United Airlines flight attendant fought against the airline's bid to end her suit accusing it of firing her for not recovering from COVID-19 fast enough, arguing that the reason given for her termination — that she misused an employee travel benefit to travel to Florida while on sick leave — is not a legitimate ground to fire her.

  • May 16, 2024

    UPS Can't Sink EEOC Suit Claiming It Spurned Deaf Drivers

    An Illinois federal judge refused Thursday to toss a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit claiming UPS refused to hire deaf applicants who were cleared by the government for truck driver positions, unpersuaded by the company's argument that the suit lacked enough detail to stay in court.

  • May 16, 2024

    ESPN Workers Drop Religious Bias Suit Over Vaccine Mandate

    Two out of three former ESPN workers who sued the sports media company and its owner, The Walt Disney Co., claiming religious persecution after they were denied exemptions from their workplace's COVID-19 vaccination requirement have dropped their claims, according to a Thursday notice filed in Connecticut federal court.

  • May 16, 2024

    FDIC's Gruenberg Scolded By Senators Over Agency Culture

    Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Chairman Martin Gruenberg on Thursday faced a second round of congressional reprimand from both sides of the political aisle over his agency's workplace misconduct scandal, but Senate Democrats seemed ready to let Gruenberg clean up the mess himself and continue his tenure.

  • May 16, 2024

    Ex-Ga. Coach Says Earlier Race Suit Doesn't Bar Title VII Suit

    A former Georgia high school football coach, who alleged his contract was terminated because of his race, urged the Eleventh Circuit to revive his suit against the Valdosta City School District on Thursday, arguing the dismissal of an earlier suit against school board members does not bar this suit.

  • May 16, 2024

    Penn Can't Dodge Fired Arabic Lecturer's Bias Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge declined to toss an Arabic lecturer's suit claiming the University of Pennsylvania fired him because he is an older Muslim man with arthritis, saying a jury needs to determine whether he got a fair review before he was terminated.

  • May 16, 2024

    Fired MSU Coach Freed From Suit Over Abuse Accuser's Texts

    A Michigan judge on Thursday tossed a privacy lawsuit against former Michigan State University football coach Mel Tucker over the sharing of text messages from an anti-sexual violence activist who has accused him of sexual harassment.

  • May 16, 2024

    Detroit Tigers 'Evasive' On Docs In Bias Suit, Former VP Says

    A former Detroit Tigers vice president suing the baseball club for race, age and sex discrimination has accused the team of being "evasive" and stonewalling the release of key documents in the case, urging a Michigan federal judge to intervene.

  • May 16, 2024

    EEOC Sees Surge In Color, Disability Bias Charges

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission recorded a 10% jump in overall discrimination charges filed in fiscal year 2023, with a record number of allegations involving either disability or color bias, according to data released by the federal government.

  • May 16, 2024

    NC Sheriff's Surety Dodges Ex-Detention Officer's Bias Suit

    An ex-detention officer accusing a local county sheriff of Title VII violations has all but abandoned her claims against the sheriff's surety, a North Carolina federal court ruled, axing all claims against the surety and leaving only a sex discrimination claim against the Mecklenburg County official.

  • May 16, 2024

    Fla. Seeks To Halt Biden's ACA Trans Discrimination Rule

    Florida urged a federal court to stop recently finalized regulations clarifying gender identity-based discrimination under the Affordable Care Act from taking effect, saying the new rules would force the state to abandon its health and safety laws or lose funding from the federal government.

  • May 16, 2024

    Ex-Bronx DA Worker Says Discrimination Suit Should Stand

    A former employee at the Bronx District Attorney's Office said Thursday she supported her claims that the office discriminated against her for seeking medical leave and denied her a promotion because she's Black, urging a New York federal court to keep alive her suit alive.

  • May 16, 2024

    Cleaning Co. Settles EEOC Sex Harassment Suit For $200K

    A cleaning company will pay $200,000 to end a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit in Wisconsin federal court claiming it ignored complaints that women were being subjected to unwanted touching and sexual advances on the job, the agency announced Thursday.

  • May 15, 2024

    'Pissed Off,' 'You Need To Go': Reps Rip FDIC's Gruenberg

    Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Chairman Martin Gruenberg took withering, bipartisan criticism over his agency's workplace misconduct scandal at a House hearing on Wednesday, although no new Democrats joined their Republican colleagues in directly calling for his resignation.

  • May 15, 2024

    Daimler Settles Worker's Suit Claiming Pot Test Got Him Fired

    Daimler Truck North America LLC has settled an employee's New Jersey federal court suit claiming he was illegally fired over a positive cannabis test following an accident in a company vehicle, even though he wasn't found at fault for the incident, according to a Wednesday court filing.

  • May 15, 2024

    Teamsters Defend Rehire Order In Dispute With Welch's

    A Welch's factory employee who was fired after being falsely accused of sexual harassment five years ago has waited long enough to be rehired, a Teamsters local argued in Pennsylvania federal court, urging a district judge to uphold an arbitrator's reinstatement order in accordance with a magistrate judge's recommendation.

  • May 15, 2024

    WWE Says $3M Deal Sends McMahon Sex Suit To Arbitration

    World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. is joining a bid by former CEO Vincent McMahon to send a suit from a woman accusing him and the organization of sex trafficking and harassment to arbitration, saying she agreed to and signed a $3 million separation agreement that includes an arbitration clause.

  • May 15, 2024

    Mass. Senate Aide Alleges Retaliation After Bias Complaint

    A constituent services aide to a Massachusetts state senator is alleging that the lawmaker and his former chief of staff stonewalled his requests for accommodation after a leg injury left him unable to climb stairs, then iced him out after he filed a complaint with the state's anti-discrimination agency.

  • May 15, 2024

    3rd Circ. Says Pa. City Isn't Covered In Cop's Employment Suit

    A Pennsylvania city cannot obtain coverage for underlying litigation brought by a police officer who has repeatedly sued the city, as his present suit is related to previous ones and is therefore excluded by the policy, the Third Circuit said Wednesday.

  • May 15, 2024

    EEOC Suit Over Vax Refuser's Firing Survives Dismissal Bid

    Arkansas-based Hank's Furniture Inc. must face a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission lawsuit claiming it unlawfully fired a Christian manager who refused the COVID-19 vaccine, with a Florida federal judge ruling the agency plausibly alleged her beliefs conflicted with the company's inoculation policy.

  • May 15, 2024

    School District, Teachers Can't Snag Win In Equal Pay Fight

    Neither a Pennsylvania school district nor the female teachers accusing it of paying them less than their male colleagues can snag a win in two consolidated Equal Pay Act suits, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, saying there are still open questions in the cases.

  • May 15, 2024

    AstraZeneca Sales Reps Win Early Cert. In Gender Bias Suit

    An Illinois federal judge on Tuesday granted a bid by workers to conditionally certify a collective in a lawsuit alleging AstraZeneca paid women less than men, giving the green light for notices to be sent out to female sales representatives who have worked at the pharmaceutical giant since late 2018.

  • May 15, 2024

    Knicks Owner Must Face Sexual Assault Suit, Accuser Says

    A massage therapist has urged a California federal court to not let New York Knicks owner James Dolan out of her lawsuit accusing him of coercing her into a sexual relationship, saying she sufficiently claimed that he forced himself on her despite her refusals.

Expert Analysis

  • Generative AI Adds Risk To Employee 'Self-Help' Discovery

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    Plaintiffs have long engaged in their own evidence gathering for claims against current or former employers, but as more companies implement generative AI tools, both the potential scope and the potential risks of such "self-help" discovery are rising quickly, says Nick Peterson at Wiley.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Workplace AI Risks

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools penetrate workplaces, employers should incorporate sound AI policies and procedures in their handbooks in order to mitigate liability risks, maintain control of the technology, and protect their brands, says Laura Corvo at White and Williams.

  • Employer Pointers As Wage And Hour AI Risks Emerge

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    Following the Biden administration's executive order on artificial intelligence, employers using or considering artificial intelligence tools should carefully assess whether such use could increase their exposure to liability under federal and state wage and hour laws, and be wary of algorithmic discrimination, bias and inaccurate or incomplete reporting, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • Race Bias Defense Considerations After 11th Circ. Ruling

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    In Tynes v. Florida Department of Juvenile Justice, the Eleventh Circuit affirmed that the McDonnell Douglas test for employment discrimination cases is merely an evidentiary framework, so employers relying on it as a substantive standard of liability may need to rethink their litigation strategy, says Helen Jay at Phelps Dunbar.

  • 6 Ways To Minimize Risk, Remain Respectful During Layoffs

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    With a recent Resume Builder survey finding that 38% of companies expect to lay off employees this year, now is a good time for employers to review several strategies that can help mitigate legal risks and maintain compassion in the reduction-in-force process, says Sahara Pynes at Fox Rothschild.

  • NYC Workplace AI Regulation Has Been Largely Insignificant

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    Though a Cornell University study suggests that a New York City law intended to regulate artificial intelligence in the workplace has had an underwhelming impact, the law may still help shape the city's future AI regulation efforts, say Reid Skibell and Nathan Ades at Glenn Agre.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Investigation Lessons In 'Minority Report'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper discuss how themes in Steven Spielberg's Science Fiction masterpiece "Minority Report" — including prediction, prevention and the fallibility of systems — can have real-life implications in workplace investigations.

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

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    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.

  • Employer Best Practices In Light Of NY Anti-Trans Bias Report

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    A recent report from the New York State Department of Labor indicates that bias against transgender and nonbinary people endures in the workplace, highlighting why employers must create supportive policies and gender transition plans, not only to mitigate the risk of discrimination claims, but also to foster an inclusive work culture, says Michelle Phillips at Jackson Lewis.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Protecting Vulnerable Workers

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    It's meaningful that the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's strategic enforcement plan prioritizes protecting vulnerable workers, particularly as the backlash to workplace racial equity and diversity, equity and inclusion programs continues to unfold, says Dariely Rodriguez at the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.

  • 4 Steps To Navigating Employee Dementia With Care

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    A recent Connecticut suit brought by an employee terminated after her managers could not reasonably accommodate her Alzheimer's-related dementia should prompt employers to plan how they can compassionately address older employees whose cognitive impairments affect their job performance, while also protecting the company from potential disability and age discrimination claims, says Robin Shea at Constangy.

  • Compliance Tips For Employers Facing An Aggressive EEOC

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    This year, the combination of an aggressive U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, a renewed focus on large-scale recruiting and hiring claims, and the injection of the complicated landscape of AI in the workplace means employers should be prepared to defend, among other things, their use of technology during the hiring process, say attorneys at Seyfarth Shaw.

  • Employer Lessons From Nixed Calif. Arbitration Agreement

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    A California state appeals court’s recent decision to throw out an otherwise valid arbitration agreement, where an employee claimed a confusing electronic signature system led her to agree to unfair terms, should alert employers to scrutinize any waivers or signing procedures that may appear to unconscionably favor the company, say Guillermo Tello and Monique Eginli at Clark Hill.