Discrimination

  • May 22, 2024

    Amazon Defeats Fired Executive's Equal Pay Suit

    A California federal judge threw out a former Amazon executive's suit alleging the online retail behemoth unlawfully fired her after complaining that a male counterpart earned more than her, ruling that revisions to her suit hadn't fixed the lack of detail previously called out by the court.

  • May 22, 2024

    Md. Clinic Fires Worker With Faulty Vision, EEOC Tells Court

    A medical clinic fired a scheduling assistant on her first day of work after learning she suffers from vision impairments that make it difficult for her to read a computer screen, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission told a Maryland federal court.

  • May 21, 2024

    NC Agency Atty Gets More Time To Prep For Bias Trial

    A North Carolina federal judge shut down the state justice department's bid to stop an attorney from calling witnesses and offering exhibits in her discrimination trial, according to a docket order that appears to give the plaintiff more time to prepare.

  • May 21, 2024

    EEOC Guidance Over Gender Identity Can't Stand, Texas Says

    The Texas attorney general requested Tuesday that a federal judge do away with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's enforcement guidance over gender identity and Title VII, arguing that the agency must be stopped from requiring employers' compliance with pronoun and bathroom accommodations.

  • May 21, 2024

    MLB Scouts' Colo. Age Bias Suit Moved To New York

    A Colorado federal judge refused to dismiss an age bias suit brought against Major League Baseball by a group of 40-and-older scouts and instead transferred the case to New York, saying he was using his discretionary authority because most defendants have no ties to his district.

  • May 21, 2024

    NY High Court Upholds State Abortion Coverage Mandate

    New York's highest court on Tuesday upheld a state law requiring employee health plans to cover medically necessary abortions, finding a 2021 U.S. Supreme Court decision didn't change the state court's determination that an exemption process in the law was constitutional.

  • May 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Restart GM Engineer's Age Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit on Tuesday backed General Motors' defeat of an engineer's lawsuit claiming he was harassed and transferred to less lucrative jobs because he's over 50, ruling he failed to show that a supervisor's sporadic comments created a hostile work environment.

  • May 21, 2024

    Food Cos. To Pay $245K To End EEOC Harassment Suit

    Several food companies will pay $245,000 to resolve a lawsuit from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleging a predecessor company's executive harassed employees with crude comments and unwanted touching and then fired workers who complained about it, a filing in California federal court said.

  • May 21, 2024

    7th Circ. Skeptical Of Bias Suit Over Honeywell DEI Video

    The Seventh Circuit appeared reluctant Tuesday to revive a former Honeywell engineer's suit claiming he was unlawfully fired after declining to watch a training film he said discriminated against white people, with judges questioning how the ex-worker could prevail if he never saw the video.

  • May 21, 2024

    Caterpillar To Pay $800K To End DOL Race Bias Probe

    Heavy equipment manufacturer Caterpillar Inc. has agreed to pay $800,000 to resolve U.S. Department of Labor allegations that it refused to hire qualified Black applicants for welding positions at an Illinois facility, the agency said Tuesday.

  • May 21, 2024

    Jury Awards Nurse $200K In Workplace Retaliation Suit

    A Puerto Rico federal jury handed a $200,000 win to a nurse in her suit accusing a government agency of standing by as a co-worker threatened to stab her and fabricated complaints against her after she alleged the colleague's friend sexually harassed her.

  • May 21, 2024

    ABA Faces Racial Bias Complaint Over Diversity Programs

    A conservative nonprofit on Tuesday hit the American Bar Association with a Title VI complaint, claiming a handful of "nefarious" ABA-led programs meant to connect minority law school students with judges are "racially discriminatory."

  • May 21, 2024

    Littler Hires Employment Advice Leader From Lewis Brisbois

    The co-chair of Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP's employment advice and counseling practice has joined Littler Mendelson PC's Providence, Rhode Island, office, the firm announced.

  • May 21, 2024

    Strategic Hiring Was The New Normal For BigLaw In 2023

    The 400 largest law firms by headcount in the U.S. grew more slowly in 2023 than in the previous two years, while Kirkland & Ellis LLP surpassed the 3,000-attorney threshold, according to the latest Law360 ranking.

  • May 21, 2024

    The Law360 400: Tracking The Largest US Law Firms

    The legal market expanded more tentatively in 2023 than in previous years amid a slowdown in demand for legal services, especially in transactions, an area that has been sluggish but is expected to quicken in the near future.

  • May 21, 2024

    Ex-Workers Drop Gender Bias Suit Against Ga. Medical Cos.

    Two female former human resources workers for a medical management company and a podiatrist center told a Georgia federal court they had agreed to drop their lawsuit accusing their ex-employers of discriminating against them based on gender, reclassifying them as hourly and firing them for complaining.

  • May 21, 2024

    3rd Circ. Revives American Airlines Pilots' Military Leave Suit

    The Third Circuit reopened a class action Tuesday accusing American Airlines of unlawfully denying pilots pay for short military assignments while compensating employees for jury duty and bereavement leave, ruling a trial is needed to determine whether time off for military service is fungible with paid absences.

  • May 20, 2024

    AMC Can Arbitrate Suit Alleging 'Hannibal' Creator Assault

    A Los Angeles judge on Monday granted AMC's request to arbitrate claims brought by a television producer who says he was sexually assaulted by "Hannibal" creator Bryan Fuller while working on a docuseries for the cable channel and also stayed claims against Fuller and all defendants.

  • May 20, 2024

    Colo. Gov. Voices 'Reservations' In Signing AI Bias Bill

    Colorado's governor has approved the nation's first framework to clamp down on algorithmic discrimination in certain artificial intelligence technologies, although he expressed several "reservations" about the measure that he urged the Legislature to address before the law takes effect in 2026. 

  • May 20, 2024

    EEOC Says Red States Can't Block PWFA Rule On Abortion

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission urged an Arkansas federal judge to reject a bid by 17 Republican state attorneys general to block recently finalized regulations that guide the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, arguing that concerns about its abortion accommodations are merely hypothetical.

  • May 20, 2024

    Cops Say Challenge To NJ City Pot Policy Is State Matter

    A pair of former Jersey City, New Jersey, cops who sued city officials alleging they were wrongfully terminated for their off-duty use of regulated cannabis have asserted that the city improperly moved the matter to federal court and that the case belongs under state jurisdiction.

  • May 20, 2024

    Tesla Must Face Sweeping Race Bias Class Action

    Tesla must face a class action by scores of Black workers accusing it of a widespread culture of racial discrimination at its factory in Fremont, California, a state trial court judge has ruled.

  • May 20, 2024

    EEOC Urges Reversal In State Farm Worker's Retaliation Suit

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission asked the Sixth Circuit to upend State Farm's win in a former worker's suit, saying there's evidence she was fired in retaliation for helping a disabled colleague lodge a complaint against her supervisor because he abruptly yanked her accommodation.

  • May 20, 2024

    Boar's Head Can't Untangle Collective In NY Late Pay Suit

    A New York federal judge said Boar's Head can't get reconsideration of an order greenlighting a collective in a late pay suit because the workers in the case supported their claims, but granted the deli meat and cheese company's request to rework the collective definition.

  • May 20, 2024

    Ex-Detroit Tigers Worker Settles Age Bias Suit With Team

    A Michigan federal judge on Monday issued a brief order dismissing an age bias lawsuit brought by a former Detroit Tigers employee against the MLB team, saying the parties informed the court they have resolved all claims just a month before trial was set to begin.

Expert Analysis

  • Where Employers Stand After 5th Circ. Overturns Title VII Test

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    The substantial impact of the recent holding in Hamilton v. Dallas County means employers in the Fifth Circuit can now be liable under Title VII for a whole range of conduct not previously covered — but the court did set limits, and employers can take tangible steps to help protect themselves, say Holly Williamson and Steven DiBeneditto at Hunton.

  • Gauging The Scope Of NYC's New AI Employment Law

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    Although employers have received some guidance on the requirements of New York City's new restriction on the use of automated employment decision tools, there are many open questions to grapple with as Local Law 144 attempts to regulate new and evolving technology, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Eye On Compliance: Women's Soccer Puts Equal Pay In Focus

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    As the U.S. Women's National Team returns from World Cup, employers can honor the fighting spirit of the athletes — which won them a historic gender pay equality settlement in 2022 — by reviewing federal equal pay compliance requirements and committing to a level playing field for all genders, says Christina Heischmidt at Wilson Elser.

  • Inflexible Remote Work Policies Can Put Employers In A Bind

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    As made clear in the recent decision by a Pennsylvania federal court in Oross v. Kutztown University, employers need to engage in individualized assessments of all requests for exemptions or accommodations to return-to-work policies to avoid potentially violating the Americans with Disabilities Act or Rehabilitation Act, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper. 

  • Congress Should Ban Employee Body Size Discrimination

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    New York City's recent enactment of a law that bans employers from discriminating against applicants and employees because of their height or weight should signal to Congress that now is the time to establish federal legislation that would prohibit such harmful practices, says Joseph Jeziorkowski at Valiant Law.

  • Why Employers Should Heed High Court Web Designer Ruling

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    While not an employment law ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in the First Amendment case 303 Creative v. Elenis raises serious questions for employers that constitute public accommodations and have related anti-discrimination policies, says Tanner Camp at Foley & Lardner.

  • What To Expect From The EEOC's Proposed Pregnancy Law

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    U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission regulations implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act require accommodations for many conditions related to pregnancy and childbirth, and while the final rule won't be published until the public comment period expires in October, employers should act promptly, says Amy Gluck at FisherBroyles.

  • Employer Best Practices For Pay Transparency Compliance

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    With conflicting pay transparency and disclosure laws appearing across the country, employers must carefully develop different strategies for discussing compensation with employees, applicants, and off-site workers, disclosing salaries in job ads, and staying abreast of new state and local compliance requirements, says Joy Rosenquist at Littler Mendelson.

  • Congress Must Level The Employer Arbitration Playing Field

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    Federal courts have largely eviscerated state bans on arbitration of employment claims through Federal Arbitration Act preemption holdings, and they are also limiting the impact of the federal Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Act, so Congress needs to step in and amend both laws, says Alan Kabat at Bernabei & Kabat.

  • What 11th Circ. Revival Of Deaf Employee's Bias Suit Portends

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent Beasley v. O'Reilly Auto Parts decision, which created a circuit split involving the issue of linking accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act to essential job functions, is a curiosity about the court's analysis at least and a potential game changer for employer duties at most, says John Doran at Sherman & Howard.

  • What To Watch As Justices Take Up Title VII Job Transfer Case

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    With its recent decision to hear Muldrow v. City of St. Louis, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether an involuntary job transfer can count as employment discrimination under Title VII — an eventual ruling that has potential to reshape workplace bias claims nationwide, says Adam Grogan at Bell Law Group.

  • Parsing EEOC Guidance On Accommodating Low Vision

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    Employers need to examine recent Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidance on provisions for employees who are blind or partially sighted, particularly on the consequences of terminating an employee with blindness or low vision without meeting obligations under the Americans with Disabilities Act, says Amy Epstein Gluck at FisherBroyles.

  • 5 Tips For Employers Handling Generative AI Privacy Risks

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    Employers should carefully consider the privacy implications of using generative artificial intelligence tools, and employ steps to mitigate the risks, such as de-identifying data, providing notice and identifying data flows, say Zoe Argento and Amy Kabaria at Littler.