Discrimination

  • May 30, 2024

    Chamber Backs Home Depot In BLM Slogan Row At 8th Circ.

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce backed Home Depot's challenge of a National Labor Relations Board decision finding the retailer illegally told a worker to remove a Black Lives Matter slogan on their apron, telling the Eighth Circuit that the board hadn't shown a connection between individual and group actions.

  • May 30, 2024

    ACLU Says Aon Hiring Tools Discriminate On Race, Disability

    The American Civil Liberties Union Foundation said Thursday it has filed a complaint against Aon Consulting Inc. with the Federal Trade Commission alleging it is using deceptive marketing tactics to push hiring technology that the company claims is bias free in contradiction of research showing otherwise.

  • May 30, 2024

    3 Factors That May Underlie EEOC Color Bias Charge Spike

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's recently published discrimination charge data for fiscal year 2023 revealed a 40% spike in allegations of color bias in American workplaces. Here are three things experts said might help explain that sharp uptick.

  • May 30, 2024

    Politics Not Behind Radio Host's Firing, Broadcaster Argues

    The broadcaster accused of wrongfully terminating radio host Grant Napear after he tweeted "All lives matter" told a California federal court in its bid for summary judgment that Napear's firing had nothing to do with politics, and everything to do with the disrespectful tone and timing of the post.

  • May 30, 2024

    Christian Teacher Appeals Pronoun Case To 7th Circ.

    An evangelical teacher who lost his job after he objected to using gender-affirming names and pronouns for his transgender students is asking the Seventh Circuit to take another look at his religious bias case.

  • May 30, 2024

    NYU Law Review Beats Bias Claims Over Diversity Efforts

    A New York federal court on Thursday dismissed a lawsuit from a self-described straight white male, first-year law student at New York University claiming the NYU Law Review is discriminatory.

  • May 30, 2024

    6th Circ. Nixes Bias Suit From Bus Driver Fired After Fight

    The Sixth Circuit refused Thursday to revive a race and disability bias suit from a Black bus driver who fought a passenger and left him on train tracks, ruling that he failed to show prejudice cost him his job rather than the violent incident.

  • May 30, 2024

    Ballard Spahr Faces Claim It Fired Worker Over Sick Husband

    A former legal assistant at Ballard Spahr LLP claims the firm fired her in retaliation for using the Family and Medical Leave Act to take time away from work to care for her cancer-stricken husband, according to a complaint filed in Pennsylvania federal court.

  • May 30, 2024

    Atty Who Missed Depo Amid Eclipse Trip Slams AAA's Fee Bid

    A lawyer sanctioned for missing a client's deposition in Florida when the attorney was viewing the solar eclipse in Arkansas has slammed the AAA organization's related fees request as "hyperinflated" and cited a popular job-hunting website to back up his argument.

  • May 30, 2024

    DOJ Says Okla. School District Violated Military Leave Law

    A school district in Oklahoma violated federal law by failing to reinstate a music teacher after he returned from military deployment in the Air Force Reserve, the U.S. Department of Justice alleged in a lawsuit. 

  • May 30, 2024

    Slapping Groping Patient Isn't Protected Action, 4th Circ. Says

    A former certified nursing assistant at a nursing home operator didn't show that smacking the hand of a patient whom she alleged groped her constituted protected activity under West Virginia law, a Fourth Circuit panel ruled Thursday, affirming the company's win in a lower court.

  • May 30, 2024

    Ex-Fox Rothschild Corporate Chief Accuses Firm Of Age Bias

    The former head of Fox Rothschild LLP's corporate department sued the firm for age discrimination Wednesday in New Jersey state court, saying it slashed his pay to below that of a first-year associate and then forced him out after nearly 30 years of employment there.

  • May 30, 2024

    Morgan & Morgan Settles Ex-Paralegal's FMLA Suit

    Morgan & Morgan PA reached a deal with a former paralegal ending her suit accusing the firm of interference and retaliation when she was unlawfully fired, she said, after requesting time off afforded by the Family and Medical Leave Act, the firm told a Florida federal judge Thursday.

  • May 30, 2024

    NLRB GC Calls On Board To Find Racism Claim Is Protected

    A National Labor Relations Board judge was right to find that a school choice nonprofit illegally terminated a worker for saying she thought her supervisor was racist, agency prosecutors argued, saying the worker's remark was linked to protected concerted activity.

  • May 30, 2024

    4th Circ. Backs Md. Agency In Worker's Telework Bias Suit

    The Fourth Circuit declined to revive a suit filed by a Maryland Department of Health worker who claims he was fired for requesting telework to manage his prediabetes, finding he couldn't overcome the agency's position that he was terminated for performance issues.

  • May 30, 2024

    Gunster Bolsters Employment And Immigration Teams In Florida

    Gunster has hired two attorneys in two separate Florida offices who will continue their practices focused on labor and employment and immigration issues, the firm announced this week.

  • May 30, 2024

    11th Circ. Backs Navy Win In National Origin Harassment Case

    An Eleventh Circuit panel refused to revive a former Naval employee's lawsuit alleging he faced harassment as a result of his Nigerian descent, holding a Florida federal judge did not err in finding he failed to establish harassment that was sufficiently severe or pervasive. 

  • May 29, 2024

    Foley & Lardner Sued For Axing Pro-Palestinian Atty's Offer

    A former Foley & Lardner LLP summer associate on Wednesday lodged discrimination claims against the firm for pulling its job offer after she made comments supporting Palestine, alleging that the firm let her go because of her religion and ethnicity, according to the suit lodged in Illinois federal court.

  • May 29, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Merrill Lynch Inks $20M Deal In Financial Advisers' Bias Suit

    Merrill Lynch has agreed to pay nearly $20 million to settle class action claims filed in Florida federal court alleging discrimination and retaliation against a proposed class of nearly 1,400 Black financial advisers who alleged they received less pay and promotions compared to their white counterparts. 

  • May 29, 2024

    Navajo President Denies VP's Claims Of Sexual Misconduct

    Navajo Nation President Buu Nygren, while denying allegations by Vice President Richelle Montoya of sexual harassment, bullying and mistreatment, said he intends to ask the tribe's council for workplace policies and procedures for the top offices, arguing that he's well aware that women within the country's largest reservation feel unheard.

  • May 29, 2024

    9th Circ. Revives Bulk Of Walmart Worker's Disability Bias Suit

    The Ninth Circuit on Wednesday reversed most of a district court's ruling in favor of Walmart on claims by a vision-impaired employee that the retail giant didn't let him return to work after a medical leave of absence, saying the employee presented evidence suggesting Walmart lied about the reasons why he couldn't return.

  • May 29, 2024

    Starbucks Gets Trans Barista's Bias Suit Kicked To Arbitration

    A New York federal judge sent to arbitration a transgender Starbucks barista's suit claiming he was harassed and ultimately fired because of his gender identity, rejecting the former employee's argument that he doesn't remember signing a deal to arbitrate.

  • May 29, 2024

    NFL Can't Juke Retaliation Claims In Reporter's Race Suit

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday hobbled a wrongful termination suit against the NFL, dismissing award-winning reporter Jim Trotter's claims of a hostile work environment and state claims but keeping the case alive through a federal claim of retaliation related to the league's decision not to renew his contract in March 2023.

  • May 29, 2024

    Ford Can Keep Win In Ex-Worker's Hostile Workplace Suit

    A former Ford employee can't get a new trial on claims that a co-worker's lewd comments and overtures led to a hostile work environment, a Michigan federal judge has ruled, finding there is sufficient evidence to support the jury's verdict in the automaker's favor.

  • May 29, 2024

    EEOC Crackdown May Hint At Pay Data Requirement Reboot

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission recently took 15 companies to court over their alleged failure to furnish workforce demographic data, an unusual enforcement push that experts say may foreshadow a renewed effort by the EEOC to require employers to turn over pay information.

Expert Analysis

  • AI Isn't The Wild West, So Prepare Now For Bias Risks

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    In addition to President Joe Biden's recent historic executive order on safe, secure and trustworthy artificial intelligence, there are existing federal and state laws prohibiting fraud, defamation and even discrimination, so companies considering using or developing AI should take steps to minimize legal and business risks, says civil rights attorney Farhana Khera.

  • AI's Baked-In Bias: What To Watch Out For

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    The federal AI executive order is a direct acknowledgment of the perils of inherent bias in artificial intelligence systems, and highlights the need for legal professionals to thoroughly vet AI systems, including data and sources, algorithms and AI training methods, and more, say Jonathan Hummel and Jonathan Talcott at Ballard Spahr.

  • 'Miss Manners' Scenarios Holds Job Accommodation Lessons

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    Robin Shea at Constangy looks at the potentially negative legal consequences for employers who follow some advice recently given in the Washington Post's "Miss Manners" column, and offers solutions of her own.

  • How Biden's AI Order Stacks Up Against Calif. And G7 Activity

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    Evaluating the federal AI executive order alongside the California AI executive order and the G7's Hiroshima AI Code of Conduct can offer a more robust picture of key risks and concerns companies should proactively work to mitigate as they build or integrate artificial intelligence tools into their products and services, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Handling Religious Objections To Abortion-Related Job Duties

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    While health care and pharmacy employee religious exemption requests concerning abortion-related procedures or drugs are not new, recent cases demonstrate why employer accommodation considerations should factor in the Title VII standard set forth by the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2023 Groff v. DeJoy ruling, as well as applicable federal, state and local laws, say attorneys at Epstein Becker.

  • Transgender Worker Rights: A Guide For California Employers

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    California employers should know their obligations under overlapping state and federal law to protect the rights of their transgender, nonbinary and gender-nonconforming workers, and implement best practices to avoid discriminating in how they hire and promote, offer medical benefits to, and prevent harassment of these employees, says Michael Guasco at Littler.

  • The Self-Funded Plan's Guide To Gender-Affirming Coverage

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    Self-funded group health plans face complicated legal risks when determining whether to cover gender-affirming health benefits for their transgender participants, so plan sponsors should carefully weigh how federal nondiscrimination laws and state penalties for providing care for trans minors could affect their decision to offer coverage, say Tim Kennedy and Anne Tyler Hall at Hall Benefits Law.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Eliminating Recruiting, Hiring Barriers

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    While the recruiting and hiring segment of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently finalized strategic enforcement plan spotlights the potential discriminatory effects of artificial intelligence, employers should note that it also touches on traditional bias issues such as unlawfully targeted job advertisements and application inaccessibility, say Rachel See and Annette Tyman at Seyfarth.

  • A Look Into The Developing Regulation Of Employer AI

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    Although employers' use of artificial intelligence is still limited, legislators and companies have been ramping up their efforts to regulate its use in the workplace, with employers actively contributing to the ongoing debate, say Gerald Hathaway and Marc-Joseph Gansah at Faegre Drinker.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Advancing Equal Pay

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    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently finalized strategic enforcement plan expresses a renewed commitment to advancing equal pay at a time when employees have unprecedented access to compensation information, highlighting for employers the importance of open communication and ongoing pay equity analyses, say Paul Evans at Baker McKenzie and Christine Hendrickson at Syndio.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Clarifies Title VII Claim Standards

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    The Second Circuit's recent opinion in Banks v. General Motors, although it does not break new ground legally, comes at a crucial time when courts are reevaluating standards that apply to Title VII claims of discrimination and provides many useful lessons for practitioners, says Carolyn Wheeler at Katz Banks.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Preventing Systemic Harassment

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    With the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's recently finalized strategic enforcement plan identifying a renewed commitment to preventing and remedying systemic harassment, employers must ensure that workplace policies address the many complex elements of this pervasive issue — including virtual harassment and workers' intersecting identities, say Ally Coll and Shea Holman at the Purple Method.

  • Cos. Must Reassess Retaliation Risk As 2nd. Circ. Lowers Bar

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    After a recent Second Circuit decision broadened the federal standard for workplace retaliation, employers should reinforce their nondiscrimination and complaint-handling policies to help management anticipate and monitor worker grievances that could give rise to such claims, says Thomas Eron at Bond Schoeneck.