Discrimination

  • April 19, 2024

    Wells Fargo Faces Sex Bias Suit Over 'Degrading' Workplace

    A Wells Fargo bond saleswoman sued the bank Friday in Illinois federal court, accusing it of sex discrimination by creating "an unapologetically sexist working environment" and passing her up for promotions despite her years of experience in the investment banking world.

  • April 19, 2024

    Corrections Dept. Can't End Sex Bias Suit Over Strip Searches

    The Virginia Department of Corrections must face a gender bias suit alleging it made workers strip naked after body scans flagged their contraceptive devices or menstruation products, a federal judge found Friday, saying the agency's actions appeared to target women.

  • April 19, 2024

    Hospital Can't Ax Ex-Worker's Disability Suit Over COVID Vax

    A New York hospital system must face an ex-worker's lawsuit alleging he was fired after refusing to get a coronavirus vaccine because of his atrial fibrillation, with a federal judge saying Friday he adequately showed the company refused to consider the bulk of medical exemption requests.

  • April 19, 2024

    CVS Narrows But Can't End HIV Patients' Disability Bias Suit

    A California federal judge declined to toss a disability bias lawsuit brought by a group of HIV or AIDS patients alleging CVS Pharmacy Inc. made their medication harder to get, saying federal regulations and even an internal company study warned that the program at issue was potentially problematic.

  • April 19, 2024

    Ex-Paramedic Hits Harris County With Sex Bias Lawsuit

    A former Houston-area paramedic is accusing a county emergency services provider of pushing her out of her job after she was sexually harassed even though she wasn't the one who reported the harassment.

  • April 19, 2024

    Calif. Panel Says Wedbush Waived Arbitration Flag Too Late

    A U.S. Supreme Court might have changed the arbitration landscape in suits involving California's Private Attorneys General Act, but Wedbush Securities Inc. still waited too long to try pushing out of court financial advisers' claims, a California state appeals court ruled.

  • April 19, 2024

    Quest Punished Black Worker For Flagging Racism, Suit Says

    Quest Diagnostics has been sued in Pennsylvania federal court by a former phlebotomist who said she faced racial discrimination from patients and retaliation from management when she complained.

  • April 19, 2024

    Ex-Defender Says High Court Ruling Backs Bias Claims

    A former assistant federal defender urged a North Carolina district court to consider a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in her sexual harassment lawsuit, arguing the high court's decision backs her claims for employment discrimination against the federal judiciary.

  • April 19, 2024

    Grocery Chain Will Pay Up To Quell EEOC Harassment Charge

    Sprouts Farmers Market agreed to shell out $265,000 to end a charge lodged with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, after an agency investigation found reasonable cause to believe workers at the organic grocery chain faced sexual harassment and were punished for complaining about it, the EEOC announced Friday.

  • April 19, 2024

    NY Forecast: Judge Considers School District Race Bias Suit

    This week a New York federal judge will consider a school district's bid to dismiss a lawsuit brought by a Black former technology specialist who claims he was fired after facing discrimination on the job based on his race. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • April 19, 2024

    Twitter Can't Sink Age Bias Suit Over Post-Musk Layoffs

    A California federal judge has refused to throw out a former Twitter employee's proposed class action alleging that a wave of layoffs following Elon Musk's acquisition of the social media platform now called X disproportionately pushed out older workers, saying the suit had enough detail to stay in court.

  • April 19, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Hilton Seeks To Undo Tips Class

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for a potential ruling on whether a class of hotel banquet event workers can continue together with wage claims against San Francisco Hilton Inc., in a long-running case that paid a visit to the Ninth Circuit. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • April 18, 2024

    Amazon Ignored Labor, IP Laws In AI 'Panic,' Ex-Worker Says

    An artificial intelligence researcher suing Amazon for labor law violations says it disregarded numerous laws in a frantic attempt to catch up to its AI rivals, directing her to ignore copyright laws in developing its large language models and retaliating when her pregnancy leave coincided with a rival's product launch.

  • April 18, 2024

    Software Co. Demoted Worker For Getting Pregnant, Suit Says

    A former sales director has claimed the software company she worked for ran afoul of federal and state laws when it gave away her job while she was on maternity leave and put her in a more junior role when she returned, according to lawsuit filed in Connecticut federal court.

  • April 18, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Ex-JPMorgan Worker's Deleted Docs Doom Suit

    The Ninth Circuit refused Thursday to reopen a former JPMorgan Chase & Co. financial adviser's lawsuit alleging he was fired for raising concerns about pushing bank-managed funds to clients, finding nothing wrong with a trial court tossing his case as punishment for deleting hundreds of electronic records.

  • April 18, 2024

    6th Circ. Axes Ex-Perrigo Worker's Drug Test Firing Suit

    The Sixth Circuit refused to reinstate a bias suit from a worker who said drugmaker L. Perrigo Co. unlawfully fired him after lip balm caused him to test positive for marijuana, saying he didn't show that age or disability discrimination motivated the decision to let him go.

  • April 18, 2024

    Qdoba To Pay $3.8M To Wrap Up Wash. Pay Transparency Suit

    Mexican restaurant chain Qdoba will pay $3.8 million to resolve a class action alleging it violated Washington state's pay transparency law when it failed to disclose pay information in job postings, according to a filing in state court.

  • April 18, 2024

    Red States Back Call To Overturn Nasdaq Diversity Rule

    Utah and 23 other Republican-led states have filed an amicus brief asking the full Fifth Circuit to vacate a Nasdaq board diversity rule and declare it unconstitutional, saying the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, which approved the rule, is "affirmatively perpetuating" race-based discrimination instead of eliminating it.

  • April 18, 2024

    Suit Alleging COVID-Inspired Racism Cleared For Trial

    A Pennsylvania federal judge won't let a boarding school escape an Asian American electrician's suit claiming he was targeted by a supervisor with threats and profanity after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and then fired for complaining about it, ruling the case should go to a jury.

  • April 18, 2024

    Amazon Strikes Deal, Staves Off Trial In Disability Bias Suit

    Amazon reached a deal to end a suit from an ex-employee who accused the e-commerce giant of pushing him out because of a knee injury stemming from his military service, ahead of a trial slated to begin in May, according to a filing in California federal court.

  • April 18, 2024

    2nd Circ. Seems Skeptical Of Equinox Trainer's Age Bias Case

    The Second Circuit appeared disinclined Thursday to revive a fired Equinox trainer's age bias lawsuit, with one judge saying he had "trouble finding" adequate evidence to back her argument that she was subjected to ageist comments that the company ignored.

  • April 18, 2024

    Purdue Beats Chinese Professor's Promotion Bias Suit

    An English literature professor at a Purdue University campus failed to convince an Indiana federal judge that she was passed over for a promotion because she's Chinese, as the judge found that the white instructor who won the job had qualifications justifying her selection.  

  • April 18, 2024

    Store Chain's Background Checks Discriminate, EEOC Says

    Convenience store chain Sheetz discriminated against nonwhite job applicants by basing hiring decisions on criminal history checks and refusing to let rejected job-seekers appeal those decisions, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission told a Maryland federal court.

  • April 17, 2024

    6th Circ. Wont Upend Nashville Worker's Retaliation Win

    The Sixth Circuit declined Wednesday to scrap a $260,000 jury win for a Nashville, Tennessee, school administrator who said she was fired for conducting a racial bias investigation, stating it's too soon for the panel to rule on whether a bankruptcy proceeding nullifies the award.

  • April 17, 2024

    Wells Fargo Headed To Trial In Ex-Exec's COVID-Era ADA Suit

    Wells Fargo is headed to trial over a former investment director's Americans with Disabilities Act claim in a suit alleging he lost his job following an accommodation request after his employer prepared to mandate a return to office, with a North Carolina federal judge also trimming the former employee's age discrimination suit.

Expert Analysis

  • Why Corporate DEI Challenges Increasingly Cite Section 1981

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    As legal challenges to corporate diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives increase in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on race-conscious college admissions last year, Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act is supplanting Title VII as conservative activist groups' weapon of choice, say Mike Delikat and Tierra Piens at Orrick.

  • Inside OMB's Update On Race And Ethnicity Data Collection

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    The Office of Management and Budget's new guidelines for agency collection of data on race and ethnicity reflect societal changes and the concerns of certain demographics, but implementation may be significantly burdensome for agencies and employers, say Joanna Colosimo and Bill Osterndorf at DCI Consulting.

  • New Wash. Laws Employers Should Pay Attention To

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    The Washington Legislature ended its session last month after passing substantial laws that should prompt employers to spring into action — including a broadened equal pay law to cover classes beyond gender, narrowed sick leave payment requirements for construction workers and protections for grocery workers after a merger, say Hannah Ard and Alayna Piwonski at Lane Powell.

  • The Shifting Landscape Of Physician Disciplinary Proceedings

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    Though hospitals have historically been able to terminate doctors' medical staff privileges without fear of court interference, recent case law has demonstrated that the tides are turning, especially when there is evidence of unlawful motivations, say Dylan Newton and Michael Horn at Archer & Greiner.

  • Anti-DEI Complaints Filed With EEOC Carry No Legal Weight

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    Recently filed complaints against several companies' diversity, equity and inclusion programs alleging unlawful discrimination against white people do not require a response from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and should not stop employers from rooting out ongoing discriminatory practices, says former EEOC general counsel David Lopez.

  • How DEI Programs Are Being Challenged In Court And Beyond

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    In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's affirmative action decision last year declaring the consideration of race in university admissions unconstitutional, employers should keep abreast of recent litigation challenging diversity, equity and inclusion training programs, as well as legislation both supporting and opposing DEI initiatives in the workplace, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • What Minority Biz Law Ruling Could Mean For Private DEI

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    A Texas federal court’s recent decision to strike down key provisions of the Minority Business Development Act illustrates the wide-reaching effects of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2023 Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard decision across legal contexts, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Texas Hair Bias Ruling Does Not Give Employers A Pass

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    A Texas state court’s recent decision, holding that a school could discipline a student with locs for refusing to cut his hair, should not be interpreted by employers as a license to implement potentially discriminatory grooming policies, says Dawn Holiday at Jackson Walker.

  • Broadway Ruling Puts Discrimination Claims In The Limelight

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    A New York federal court's recent decision in Moore v. Hadestown Broadway that the employers' choice to replace a Black actor with a white actor was shielded by the First Amendment is the latest in a handful of rulings zealously protecting hiring decisions in casting, say Anthony Oncidi and Dixie Morrison at Proskauer.

  • Breaking Down California's New Workplace Violence Law

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    Ilana Morady and Patrick Joyce at Seyfarth discuss several aspects of a new California law that requires employers to create and implement workplace violence prevention plans, including who is covered and the recordkeeping and training requirements that must be in place before the law goes into effect on July 1.

  • Studying NY, NJ Case Law On Employee Social Media Rights

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    While a New Jersey state appeals court has twice determined that an employee's termination by a private employer for social media posts is not prohibited, New York has yet to take a stand on the issue — so employers' decisions on such matters still need to be assessed on a case-by-case basis, say Julie Levinson Werner and Jessica Kriegsfeld at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Eye On Compliance: Employee Social Media Privacy In NY

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    A New York law that recently took effect restricts employers' ability to access the personal social media accounts of employees and job applicants, signifying an increasing awareness of the need to balance employers' interests with worker privacy and free speech rights, says Madjeen Garcon-Bonneau at Wilson Elser.

  • Draft Pay Equity Rule May Pose Contractor Compliance Snags

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    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed rule that would prohibit government contractors from requesting certain job applicants' salary history seems simple on the surface, but achieving compliance will be a nuanced affair for many contractors who must also adhere to state and local pay transparency laws, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.