Corporate Crime & Compliance UK

  • May 14, 2024

    Autonomy Overstated Revenue Before HP Sale, Jury Hears

    Autonomy's reported revenue was overstated by a combined $300 million in the two-and-a-half years before HP acquired it, an accounting expert testified Tuesday in a California criminal trial over claims that Autonomy founder Michael Lynch duped HP into buying his software company for an inflated $11.7 billion price.

  • May 14, 2024

    Billionaire's Pilot Cops To Tax Count, Avoids Insider Trial

    A pilot from Virginia accused of profiting from stock tips fed to him by British billionaire Joe Lewis on Tuesday copped to dodging taxes on $500,000 of income from Lewis' company, in a plea deal that avoids an insider trading trial.

  • May 14, 2024

    Communications Panel Seeks Stiffer Fines On SLAPP Suits

    The chair of a House of Lords committee on Tuesday urged the government to increase the Solicitors Regulation Authority's fining powers to crack down on litigation designed to silence reporting about wealthy and powerful individuals.

  • May 14, 2024

    SFO Boss Suggests Paying Whistleblowers From Plea Deals

    The U.K. should pay whistleblowers for providing smoking gun evidence of wrongdoing from any corporate settlement they help bring about, to compensate them for the risk of coming forward, the director of the Serious Fraud Office told lawmakers on Tuesday.

  • May 14, 2024

    Fuel Trader Did Not Hide £5M Commissions From Employer

    A former biodiesel trader accused of pocketing the equivalent of £5.2 million ($6.5 million) in secret commissions never hid the payments and worked hard to negotiate the best price for his employer, his lawyer told a jury Tuesday.

  • May 14, 2024

    UniCredit Bids To Toss $69M Plane Payment Sanctions Ruling

    UniCredit urged an appeals court on Tuesday to overturn a ruling that it was not reasonable for its London branch to believe it was prohibited from making $69.3 million in payments to three Irish lessors tied to aircraft held in Russia because of Western sanctions.

  • May 14, 2024

    EU Watchdog Sets Anti-Greenwashing Guidelines For Funds

    The European Union's markets regulator on Tuesday published its final guidelines for firms using ESG terms in fund names, requiring 80% of the fund's investments to match the claimed criteria to combat greenwashing risk.

  • May 14, 2024

    Gov't To Add Legal Powers, Staff To Stop Benefits Fraud

    The Department for Work and Pensions said Tuesday it will support new legislation to expand its powers to make arrests and conduct searches in its crackdown on benefits fraud.

  • May 14, 2024

    Taxpayers Could Face Bill For 'Shadow Fleet' Oil Spill

    British taxpayers could be on the hook for the cleanup if oil leaks from a ship operating without full insurance as a result of sanctions imposed on Russia, a senior figure at Lloyd's of London warned a panel of MPs on Tuesday.

  • May 13, 2024

    Irked Autonomy Judge Vents On HP Fraud Trial's Slow Pace

    U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer on Monday blasted lawyers for the government and two former Autonomy Corp. PLC executives in a criminal fraud case over the trial's slow progress, saying he's "annoyed," but also "complicit" because he "did not take more of a controlling posture."

  • May 13, 2024

    EU Designates Booking.com As Gatekeeper, X Ads Escape

    The Dutch company that owns popular travel site Booking.com is the latest company to be hit with the gatekeeper designation by the European Commission, and the social media platform X may be next.

  • May 13, 2024

    Candey, Ex-Partner Face Tribunal Over Alleged AML Breach

    Candey Ltd. and a former partner breached money laundering regulations by not adequately checking the source of nearly £24 million ($30 million) of client funds earmarked for a property purchase, the Solicitors Regulation Authority told a tribunal Monday.

  • May 13, 2024

    Barclays Can Keep $148M Russian Swaps Dispute In London

    Barclays has secured a permanent London court order preventing sanctioned Russian state investment company VEB from taking its $147.7 million swaps dispute with the bank away from the U.K. to an arbitration court in Moscow.

  • May 13, 2024

    Law Firm Beats Paralegal's COVID Whistleblower Claim

    An employment tribunal has dismissed a former paralegal's claim alleging she was unfairly dismissed for raising complaints about her mentor's behavior and COVID-19 practices, finding the disclosures didn't play a part in the firm's decision to fire her.

  • May 13, 2024

    CMA Can Appeal Nixed £100M Fine In NHS Drug Pricing Case

    The Competition and Markets Authority was granted permission on Monday to challenge a tribunal's ruling that overturned more than £100 million ($126 million) in fines against drug companies for fixing agreements that allegedly increased the price of hydrocortisone tablets.

  • May 13, 2024

    Royal Mail Beats Rival's Costs Claim, But £600M Trial Still Set

    Royal Mail has beaten a rival's claim for £2.8 million ($3.5 million) in legal costs that arose when it helped the communications watchdog uphold a £50 million fine against the postal delivery service.

  • May 13, 2024

    Gov't Tells Finance, Law Watchdogs To Improve AML Reports

    HM Treasury and Britain's anti-money laundering watchdog have told professional bodies in sectors including law and accounting to sharpen the focus in their annual reports on failures in compliance and supervisory actions.

  • May 13, 2024

    BetCity Says €850M Buyout Was Good Value Despite Inquiries

    The former owners of online sports betting operator BetCity admit that they breached some of the terms from Entain's €850 million ($920 million) buyout, but have argued that the gambling giant knew of the investigations and failed to seek a better deal.

  • May 10, 2024

    Stagecoach's £25M Ticket Class Action Settlement Approved

    The U.K.'s Competition Appeal Tribunal has agreed to passenger rail operator Stagecoach's £25 million ($31 million) settlement with passengers who say they were overcharged for train tickets.

  • May 10, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen Playtech file an intellectual property claim against online casino company OnAir Entertainment amid allegations of corporate spying, a broadcast equipment company sue its former owner amid allegations he conspired to inflate a customer’s finances, and aerospace company Vertical Aerospace hit a manufacturer with a claim following a test flight crash. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • May 10, 2024

    UK Class Actions Face Tougher Test On Distributing Damages

    A decision by the antitrust tribunal to certify a £790 million ($990 million) mass claim against major European power cable suppliers came with the caveat that it intends to take a tougher approach toward claimant lawyers' plans for getting awards into the pockets of consumers.

  • May 10, 2024

    Ex-Plastics Co. Manager Spared Prison For Insider Dealing

    A London judge gave a former manager at a plastics company an 18-month suspended prison sentence on Friday for insider dealing in connection with the £261 million ($327 million) purchase of a rival company.

  • May 10, 2024

    Director Imprisoned For Deceiving FCA In £1.2M Fraud Probe

    A business director was sentenced to 18 months in prison on Friday for providing a forged document to investigators in a fruitless attempt to prop up the defense of self-styled investment brokers now convicted of a £1.2 million ($1.5 million) boiler room fraud.

  • May 10, 2024

    Ex-Madagascan Official, Partner Get 5½ Years For Bribery Plot

    A former leading aide to the president of Madagascar and her French associate were sentenced on Friday to a total of more than five-and-a-half years in prison for soliciting bribes to secure mining rights in the southeast African country for a U.K. gem company.

  • May 10, 2024

    Osborne Clarke Lawyer To Face Tribunal Over Zahawi SLAPP

    An Osborne Clarke LLP partner who represented Nadhim Zahawi could face a disciplinary tribunal over allegations that he used intimidatory warnings in an attempt to silence a critic who was probing the former Conservative chancellor's tax affairs.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    PACCAR Should Be 1st Step To Regulating Litigation Funders

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    Rather than reversing the U.K. Supreme Court's well-reasoned judgment in PACCAR v. Competition Appeal Tribunal, imposing a regulatory regime on litigation funders in parity with that of lawyers, legislators should build upon it to create a more transparent, competitive and fairer funding industry, says Rosa Curling at Foxglove.

  • EEA Equivalence Statement Is Welcomed By Fund Managers

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    The recent statement confirming European Economic Area equivalence to undertakings for collective investment in transferable securities for U.K. overseas funds regime purposes removes many managers’ concerns in the wake of Brexit, giving a clear pathway out of temporary marketing permissions and easing the transition from one regime to another, says Catherine Weeks at Simmons & Simmons.

  • In Int'l Arbitration Agreements, Be Clear About Governing Law

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    A trilogy of recent cases in the English High Court and Court of Appeal highlight the importance of parties agreeing to explicit choice of law language at the outset of an arbitration agreement in order to avoid costly legal skirmishes down the road, say lawyers at Faegre Drinker.

  • Post Office Scandal Stresses Key Directors Duties Lessons

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    The Post Office scandal, involving hundreds of wrongful convictions of subpostmasters based on an IT failure, offers lessons for company directors on the magnitude of the impact that a failure to fulfill their duties can have on employees and the company, says Simon Goldberg at Simons Muirhead.

  • Employer Tips For Handling Data Subject Access Requests

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    As employers face numerous employee data-subject access requests — and the attendant risks of complaints to the Information Commissioner's Office — issues such as managing deadlines and sifting through data make compliance more difficult, highlighting the importance of efficient internal processes and clear communication when responding to a request, say Gwynneth Tan and Amy Leech at Shoosmiths.

  • Comparing UK And EU's View On 3rd-Party Service Providers

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    The U.K. is taking welcome steps to address the lack of direct oversight over critical third-party service providers, and although less onerous than that of the EU Digital Operational Resilience Act, the U.K. regime's proportionate approach is designed to make providers more robust and reliable, say lawyers at Shearman.

  • CMA Road Map Helps Cos. Prepare For UK Digital Markets Bill

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    Although only provisional, the recent publication of the Competition and Markets Authority's road map for the implementation of the U.K. Digital Markets Bill demonstrates that the regulator is keen to reassure Parliament that it takes accountability seriously, and that there will be sufficient safeguards in place regarding its decision making, say lawyers at Morgan Lewis.

  • Opinion

    European Union Criticisms Of The FCPA Are Misguided

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    Some in the European Union have criticized U.S. enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act for what they perceive as jurisdictional overreach, but this appears to overlook the crucial fact that jurisdiction is voluntary, and critics should focus instead on the lack of equivalent laws in their own region, say John Joy and YuTong Wang at FTI Law.

  • Key Points Of BoE Response To Digital Pound Consultation

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    Lawyers at Hogan Lovells analyze the recent Bank of England and U.K. government response to a consultation on the launch of a digital pound, finding that the phased approach to evaluating the issues makes sense given the significant potential impact on the U.K. economy.

  • Bribery Class Action Ruling May Revive Bifurcated Processes

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    The Court of Appeal's recent decision allowing the representative bribery action in Commission Recovery v. Marks & Clerk offers renewed hope for claimants to advance class claims using a bifurcated process amid its general absence as of late, say Jon Gale and Justin Browne at Ashurst.

  • Goldman Prosecution Delivers A Clear Sign Of FCA Strength

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    The recent successful prosecution of a former Goldman Sachs analyst for insider dealing and fraud is a reminder to regulated individuals that economic crime will never be tolerated, and that the Financial Conduct Authority is willing to bare its teeth in the exercise of its prosecutorial remit, says Doug Cherry at Fladgate.

  • Whistleblower Pay Is A Risky Path For The SFO To Tread

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    In a recent speech, Serious Fraud Office director Nick Ephgrave supported the payment of whistleblowers, but implementing such an extreme measure is potentially hazardous and could leave the new director a hostage to fortune, says Richard Cannon at Stokoe Partnership.

  • The Good, The Bad And The New Of The UK Sanctions Regime

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    Almost six years after the Sanctions and Money Laundering Act was introduced, the U.K. government has published a strategy paper that outlines its focus points and unveils potential changes to the regime, such as a new humanitarian exception for financial sanctions, highlighting the rapid transformation of the U.K. sanctions landscape, says Josef Rybacki at WilmerHale.

  • Businesses Using AI Face Novel Privacy, Cybersecurity Risks

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    Rapid advancements in artificial intelligence are resulting in complex privacy and cybersecurity challenges for businesses, and with the forthcoming EU AI Act and enhancement of existing laws to ensure a high common level of security, key stakeholders should be empowered to manage associated risks, say lawyers at Goodwin.

  • A Look At Environment Agency's New Economic Crime Unit

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    Sophie Wood at Kingsley Napley explains how the Environment Agency’s newly established Economic Crime Unit will pursue criminal money flows from environmental offenses, and discusses the unit’s civil powers, including the ability to administer account freezing and forfeiture orders, says Sophie Wood at Kingsley Napley.

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