Construction

  • February 21, 2024

    Contractor Says Lima Merits Sanctions In $140M Award Row

    A municipal contractor has asked a D.C. federal court to sanction Lima, Peru, for prolonging its efforts to enforce nearly $140 million in arbitral awards it won over a highway contract that went awry, saying the city has unnecessarily prolonged the dispute with two actions.

  • February 21, 2024

    Alaska Tribes Seek Rights Declaration Over BC Gold Mines

    A consortium of southeast Alaska tribes is asking the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights to hold an investigative hearing and declare that Canada is violating their human rights by considering and approving mines that threaten to pollute cross-border rivers and harm vital salmon fisheries without seeking the tribes' input or consent.

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices Urged To Turn Away $285M Panama Canal Award Suit

    The operator of the Panama Canal on Tuesday urged the U.S. Supreme Court to turn away a case in which $285 million in arbitral awards are being challenged over an arbitrator's "evident partiality," saying close relationships between arbitrators are so "ubiquitous" in international arbitration that they are unremarkable.

  • February 21, 2024

    Cannabis CEOs Wasted Wealthy Russian's Money, Suit Claims

    Two California businessmen who were given $145 million by a now dead Russian billionaire to begin cannabis growing operations in the state are accused of gross mismanagement and squandering his investment, according to a lawsuit filed in Los Angeles County court.

  • February 21, 2024

    GAO Backs Army Rejection Of Unclear Bid For Deals In Korea

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has agreed with the U.S. Army's decision to deem unacceptable an engineering firm's bid for construction deals in South Korea, as the watchdog found the bids unclear on who would perform certain quality control and safety activities.

  • February 21, 2024

    7th Circ. Says Excavator's Kickback Appeal Doesn't Add Up

    A Seventh Circuit panel seemed unconvinced Wednesday by a former excavation company employee seeking to overturn his kickback conviction, with one judge suggesting he had two unpersuasive arguments and was trying to make "0 + 0 = 1."

  • February 21, 2024

    Mass., Property Developer Strike Deal Over Wetlands Pollution

    The state of Massachusetts and a nationwide residential property developer have settled claims the company caused sediment runoff in wetlands in a town about 16 miles south of Boston, in violation of the Clean Water Act.

  • February 21, 2024

    Green Groups Press FERC To Rescind Tenn. Pipeline Approval

    Environmentalists on Tuesday urged the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to undo its approval of a Tennessee pipeline project that will serve a Tennessee Valley Authority gas-fired power plant that is replacing a coal-fired plant, saying the agency botched its consideration of the project's climate change impacts.

  • February 21, 2024

    Commerce Can't Cite Wikipedia To Expand Duties, Court Says

    The U.S. Department of Commerce couldn't convince the U.S. Court of International Trade that Wikipedia articles supported its expansion of vertical engine tariffs, with a judge noting that U.S. courts have repeatedly rejected Wikipedia as a source.

  • February 20, 2024

    Bid-Rigging Suit Against Bloomberg And Turner Ruled Too Old

    A defunct drywall contractor has lost its bid to hold Bloomberg LP and Turner Construction to account for a blackballing and bid-rigging campaign, as a New York federal judge ruled the suit was filed too late despite a related appeal to the Second Circuit.

  • February 20, 2024

    11th Circ. Tosses Appeal Of Bid-Rigging Indictment

    The Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday found that a concrete executive has to wait until after he's tried to contest his indictment by a remotely convened grand jury during the pandemic on charges of allegedly fixing prices and rigging bids for ready-mix concrete in Georgia.

  • February 20, 2024

    Tribes, Enviro Orgs Can Join Fight Over Tongass Protections

    An Alaska federal judge said a coalition of tribes, conservation groups, fishers and tourism businesses can join litigation to help defend a challenged Biden administration rule that reinstated roadless area protections for some 9 million acres of the vast Tongass National Forest.

  • February 20, 2024

    5th Circ. Seeks Texas Justices' Input On LNG Permit Fight

    The Fifth Circuit has yanked its prior ruling that scrapped an emissions permit issued by Texas environmental regulators for a proposed liquefied natural gas terminal, saying it wants the state's Supreme Court to weigh in on how to define the best available pollution control technology under Texas law.

  • February 20, 2024

    Restoration Architect Says Visa Denial Ignored Evidence

    A Colombian restoration architect who wants to address the affordable housing shortage in the U.S., accused immigration officials in Florida federal court of disregarding more than 1,000 pages of evidence in denying him a national interest waiver for a visa.

  • February 20, 2024

    Angry Buyer Told Machine Seller, 'I'll Kill You All,' Jury Hears

    Counsel for an Italy-based woodworking machinery manufacturer told an Atlanta federal jury Tuesday that their client's employees had been subjected to "profanity, and insults, and actual threats of physical violence" from a disgruntled customer who claimed his company had been sold a "lemon" of a high-tech wood cutting device.

  • February 20, 2024

    DC Circ. Says FERC Fight Over 'Onshore' Meaning Is Moot

    The D.C. Circuit has dumped a fight between the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and an advocacy group concerning whether the agency has jurisdiction over facilities that transport liquefied natural gas to port via truck, saying the dispute is moot because the proposed facility in question isn't being built.

  • February 20, 2024

    Pa. Contractor Says Ohio Cosmetic Centers Skipped $2M Bill

    A construction contractor took the owner of several medical spa and cosmetic surgery practices to Pennsylvania state court on Friday after the healthcare firm allegedly halted projects in two Ohio suburbs and then failed to pay $2 million that the builder was owed for its work on them.

  • February 16, 2024

    4th Circ. Won't Rethink Overturning Bid-Rigging Conviction

    The Fourth Circuit declined to reconsider a panel ruling that overturned a former Contech executive's bid-rigging conviction, despite the U.S. Department of Justice's contention that the decision flouts long-standing precedent.

  • February 16, 2024

    FERC Rejects Hydro Project Permits Amid Tribal Opposition

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has denied preliminary permits for three proposed hydropower projects on Navajo Nation land in Arizona, saying a recently revised policy clarifying Indigenous rights in the agency's decision-making process and the tribe's overwhelming opposition to the applications swayed the decision.

  • February 16, 2024

    Clean Energy Cos. Must Pay Heed To PFAS Crackdown

    The clean energy industry shouldn't downplay the growing scrutiny over so-called forever chemicals, many of which are present in key components of their projects and can't be easily replaced, attorneys say.

  • February 16, 2024

    Florida Loses Wetland Permitting Authority In D.C. Court Case

    A D.C. judge has stripped Florida of its federally delegated authority to permit wetlands development, ruling that U.S. environmental regulators failed to analyze the impact of their decision on endangered and threatened species and handing a victory to conservation groups challenging the program.

  • February 16, 2024

    Feds Tell 1st Circ. Mass. Wind Farm Approval Was Sound

    The federal government has said a Massachusetts federal judge properly dumped a challenge lodged by commercial fishing groups seeking to upend federal approvals of the Vineyard Wind project, telling the First Circuit that the record shows federal agencies thoroughly studied the project's potential impacts.

  • February 16, 2024

    Condo Co., Insurer Settle Proposed Class Action Coverage

    A Miami condominium, its former management company and various insurers agreed to settle coverage for a proposed class action accusing the condominium companies of allowing the building to deteriorate, a Florida federal judge said Friday, staying the coverage litigation while the parties finalize the deal.

  • February 16, 2024

    Trump Owes $355M For Fraud That 'Shocks The Conscience'

    A New York state judge on Friday found Donald Trump, his adult sons, his companies and longtime executives liable for a decadelong valuation fraud conspiracy, ordering the defendants to disgorge $364 million in ill-gotten gains to the state, plus interest, with the former president on the hook for the lion's share.

  • February 16, 2024

    Quartz Biz Says Customs Charged Tariffs On Duty-Free Goods

    A quartz importer took U.S. Customs and Border Protection to court over its assessment of anti-dumping duties on dozens of quartz surface products that the U.S. Department of Commerce said should be imported duty-free.

Expert Analysis

  • A Look Ahead For The Electric Vehicle Charging Industry

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    This will likely be an eventful year for the electric vehicle market as government efforts to accelerate their adoption inevitably clash with backlash from supporters of the petroleum industry, say Rue Phillips at SkillFusion and Enid Joffe at Green Paradigm Consulting.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Reducing The Risk Of PFAS False Advertising Class Actions

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    A wave of class actions continues to pummel products that allegedly contain per- or polyfluoroalkyl substances, with plaintiffs challenging advertising that they say misleads consumers by implying an absence of PFAS — but there are steps companies can take to minimize risk, say attorneys at Keller and Heckman.

  • Challenges Remain In Financing Energy Transition Minerals

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    COP28, the latest U.N. climate conference, reached a consensus on a just and equitable transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy, but more action and funding will be needed to ensure that developed countries responsibly source the minerals that will be critical for this process, say attorneys at Watson Farley.

  • USCIS Fee Increases May Have Unintended Consequences

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    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ new fee schedule, intended to provide the agency with needed funds while minimizing the impact of higher fees on individual immigrants and their families, shifts too much of the burden onto employers, say Juan Steevens and William Coffman at Mintz.

  • Assessing The Future Of Colorado's Economic Loss Rule

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    The Colorado Supreme Court's decision to review a state appellate court's ruling in Mid-Century Insurance Co. v. HIVE Construction will significantly influence the future of Colorado's economic loss rule, with high stakes for the cost of doing business in the state, says David Holman at Crisham & Holman.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Opinion

    New La. Gas Pipeline Projects Must Respect Rules And Rights

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    As pipeline developers rush to join in Louisiana's Haynesville Shale gas boom, established operators like Energy Transfer are justified in demanding that newer entrants respect safety rules, regulatory requirements and property rights when proposing routes that would cross existing pipelines, says Joshua Campbell at Campbell Law.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Preparing For A New Wave Of Litigation Under Silicosis Rules

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    After the Division of Occupational Safety and Health of California issued an emergency temporary standard to combat noncompliance with assessments of workers' exposure to particles of crystalline silica, companies that manufacture, distribute or sell silica-containing products will need aggressive case-specific discovery to navigate a new wave of litigation, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Standing And A Golden Rule

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Victoria Angle at MoFo examines one recent decision that clarifies the elements necessary to establish prejudice and federal claims court standing in multiphase protests, and two that exemplify a government procurements golden rule.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Brazil

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    Environmental, social and governance issues have increasingly translated into new legislation in Brazil since 2020, and in the wake of these recently enacted regulations, we are likely to see a growing number of legal disputes in the largest South American country related to ESG issues such as greenwashing if companies are not prepared to adequately adapt and comply, say attorneys at Mattos Filho.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • High Court Case Could Reshape Local Development Fees

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    If last month's oral arguments are any indication of how the U.S. Supreme Court will rule in Sheetz v. County of El Dorado, it's unlikely the justices will hold that the essential nexus and rough proportionality tests under the cases of Nollan, Dolan and Koontz apply to legislative exactions, but a sweeping decision would still be the natural progression in the line of cases giving property owners takings claims, says Phillip Babich at Reed Smith.

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